Getting the most out of your medical appointments: more tips from a Consultant Oncologist

 

portrait_RichardSimcock

Meet Richard!

Following on from his last blog post about preparing to meet your oncologist, Consultant Oncologist Richard Simcock writes about the best way to start a consultation with your doctor – and ways you can follow up afterwards.

 

 

 

 


Signposting

If you go to a show you normally know what you’re going to see. Have you ever seen a film or play where you literally knew nothing at all about it before it started? You were likely to have been initially bewildered as you got your bearings. Arriving at a consultation knowing what to expect means less confusion: it allows you to get straight to the substance. It is good practice for a healthcare professional to explain the purpose of the meeting (‘Today I want to explain your radiotherapy treatment’ etc.), but that isn’t always the case.

A reasonable question to ask is ‘What are you hoping to discuss today?’ This also gives you an opportunity to highlight any areas that you know that you want to cover and leads to better time prioritisation. If a follow-up meeting is being arranged, then asking ‘what would you expect us to discuss at our next meeting?’ leads to even better preparation.

Ask for Copies

After almost every clinic consultation a letter will be written. These letters have multiple purposes: they inform the referring clinician, they may be a request (e.g. ‘please prescribe drug X’), and they also act as a record of the meeting (much better than a scrawled note in undecipherable handwriting!).

Eighteen years ago, the NHS plan recommended ‘patients should as of right receive copies of all correspondence between health professionals about their care.’ This was enshrined in the 2015 NHS Constitution. Copies of letters written about you will be sent automatically in most cases. If you’re unsure whether and how this happens, it’s reasonable to check just in case it isn’t yet routine for the doctor you are seeing: ‘Will you send me a copy of the letter you send to my doctor?’

yellow spiral notebooks

Try filing your own notes

Not every patient wants their letters, and if you wish not to receive a copy you should make that clear too, in case letters are sent automatically.

In my opinion, far better is a letter written to the patient first and foremost. This should avoid issues with jargon and misunderstanding, but it’s also a part of patient-centred decision-making. The Academy of Royal Colleges recently produced a report (‘Please Write to Me’)  with a  ‘How to..’ document for doctors around writing directly to patients, and I’m hopeful that this will become increasingly standard practice.

You are entitled to copies of results and reports too. This can be problematic as these are almost always written in the dense jargon of the specialty. Breast Cancer Care produces a guide to understanding a breast cancer pathology report and there are other online resources for other cancers. Asking for a summary of what the report means is very reasonable, but asking for a tutorial on the meaning of every word may not be the best use of precious consultation time. As we move to a time where patients will (hopefully) be able to access more of their own data via portals, medical specialists will need to produce more readable report summaries.

Key worker

You should be allocated a ‘key worker’ – this will most often be a clinical nurse specialist (CNS). Many CNS are highly expert in their field and will know answers to all the common questions, and most of the complicated ones too. They can be invaluable in helping you navigate what is happening before, during, and after a consultation. They will often help patients ‘debrief’, particularly if a clinic meeting has been complicated or upsetting. Key workers are there to act as your advocate and help you to get the best, most personalised care. If you know that you have a lot of questions to ask, then first flag this with your key worker before a meeting: your key worker will be able to answer many questions for you, as well as prepare the doctors in the clinic and potentially organise a longer slot.

Macmillan helps to support over 4300 CNS in the NHS and yet we know there are still inadequate numbers. This means not all patients will get the CNS/key worker access they need or deserve. It is always reasonable to ask ‘Do I have a key worker/CNS? And how can I get hold of them if I have questions?’

Occasionally, a doctor-patient relationship is not good.  Communication will be poor as a result. Every doctor can have a bad day when they perform less well, but if you think you are not able to have a good meeting with a doctor attached to your care then this is an issue that your key worker should be able to handle sensitively. Key workers can often help by arranging another member of the team to see you where possible.

Second (and third and fourth) opinions

person holding twist pen sitting on chair near laptop and notebook

Your case is reviewed by multiple doctors

It is standard within the NHS that all newly diagnosed cancer cases are discussed by a multidisciplinary team of professionals. I attend two of these meetings a week. In the Head and Neck cancer meeting, I sit with two other oncologists, a consultant radiologist and pathologist, three specialist nurses, three dieticians, two speech and language therapists, a consultant dentist, a specialist radiographer, and six consultant surgeons and trainees. We discuss every case, and multiple different approaches to the patient’s problem. Later in clinic we will meet the patient and present a summary view. The ‘first opinion’ is often the combination of multiple expert opinions.

You might want to ask ‘Has my case been discussed at the MDT and were any other options discussed?’. This might be particularly important if there are different possible treatments.

Records of the MDT discussion are also available.

Despite these multiple opinions you may still feel that you would like another team to consider your case. A second opinion can be arranged by your treating team (hospital to hospital) but the mechanisms by which hospitals get paid mean that it is often preferred if the request for another opinion comes from your GP. Transferring clinical information and the masses of data contained within scans can now usually be achieved instantly and electronically. Be aware that another opinion will inevitably lengthen the time before treatment can be delivered.

Research and Trials

Research in cancer is vital to drive innovation and improve survival. Clinical centres that engage in research may produce better results (this has been shown in recent radiotherapy trials), perhaps through more detailed systems of quality assurance.

You may be offered the opportunity to take part in a clinical trial, but if you are not then a good question to ask is ‘Are there any clinical trials for my situation in this hospital?’

If there are no local trials then looking at the National Cancer Research Institute website and their Portfolio Maps for a specific cancer will show what important questions investigators have about treating that disease.

If trials are not available locally it is helpful to ask if there are other accessible centres that are running relevant research. This information will usually be available to your team although you will have to consider carefully if the promise of a trial justifies the burden of travel to a centre further away from home.

Conclusion

There is a whole science devoted to analysing different styles of doctor-patient communication and ultimately doctors want the meetings with their patients to be effective, efficient, and friendly.

‘Communication’ has a double meaning – it can also mean a connection between places, a route or a bridge. Good communication should be able to take you somewhere new: bring you to a new point of awareness or knowledge. I hope these tips help you make the best use of those vital minutes, so you have maximum opportunity to arrive at the best possible destination of understanding.

Richard tweets as @BreastDocUK. He is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at the Sussex Cancer Centre. 

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