Adoption after cancer

In this guest blog post, Emma Owen from PACT discusses adoption after cancer and finds out the answers to some of the Shine Cancer Support community’s burning questions.


As a charity that finds adoptive parents for children in care, we get all sorts of questions from people who want to find out more about whether adoption is right for them. We get asked frequently:  “Do I have to be married or in a relationship, or can I adopt on my own?”, “Do I need to own by own home?” or “Can I adopt if I’m gay?”. 

The answers to these question are straightforward – Yes you can adopt on your own, no you don’t have to own your own home, and yes, you can adopt if you are gay!

But when it comes to health there is no one answer for all. Every single case is individual and different to the next person. We frequently get asked whether someone who has had cancer can adopt. The short answer is – possibly.

The first thing to remember is that having had a cancer diagnosis and treatment does not automatically prevent anyone from being accepted, assessed and approved as an adoptive parent.

In fact, tenacity, resilience and positivity that people have demonstrated while undergoing treatment for cancer are great qualities for adopters. But this needs to be balanced with ensuring that an adopter has the energy and strength to parent their child into adulthood and beyond.

As well as thinking of your own hopes and dreams for a family, you must also think of the needs of the child. An adopted child will already have suffered loss, and possibly trauma, and any adoptive parent must be emotionally, as well as medically, fit to care for a child who has had a difficult start in life.

As part of the adoption process you will need to have an adoption health assessment with your GP and this will need to be seen by PACT’s medical adviser. Your treating consultant will be asked for a reference and their view will be influential in the decision as to whether you can proceed with adoption.

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PACT’s medical advisor Dr Efun Johnson said: “The assessment process seeks to explore individual strengths to parent, using available health information on health status and likely risks that may impact on meeting the physical, emotional and developmental needs of a child.” 

I asked Dr Efun to answer some of the most common adoption questions we get asked by people who have suffered from cancer.

Q: Do you have to wait a certain length of time after you finish treatment before adoption agencies will accept you? 

Dr Efun: “Every cancer differs and detection could be at differing stages. After treatment and remission or cure we would ask that you give yourself a year or two to settle before you apply to adopt. In some cases you may need to wait up to five years. 

Q: What if you have disabilities after cancer treatment and your partner had cancer too or has health issues – is adoption still an option?

Dr Efun: “It is the capacity and ability to look after and parent a child that is looked at as well as both yours and your partner’s health. Yes adoption is still an option. 

Q: What if you have cancer long term but it’s not currently life-threatening, can you adopt then?

Dr Efun: “It depends on the individual situation.”  

We also have some more general questions, which I put to PACT’s Adoption Team Manager Mandy Davies.

Q: If cancer leaves you unable to adopt, would it be possible for your partner to adopt a child in their name only? Then share parenting commitments? 

Mandy: “While a couple are living together there would need to be a joint assessment.  If we were not able to proceed due to cancer it is likely to be because of a limited life expectancy.  If an adoptive parent were to die, this loss would have a huge impact on an adopted child who will have already lost their birth parents and probably foster carers.”  

Q: What are the first steps if I want to find out about adopting?

Mandy: “Do your research into what’s involved in the process, the children waiting and all the things any adoptive parent needs to consider. We have a Guide to Adoption on the PACT website which is a great place to start. Then I’d suggest coming along to an information event. At PACT information events we have talk from a social worker about the process and an adopter to tell their story and you have the opportunity to ask any questions.”

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At PACT, we have many survivors of cancer who have successfully been approved as adopters and gone on to have a family through adoption.

Marcia and her husband adopted their two daughters after she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and successfully treated with an aggressive course of chemotherapy and a mastectomy. 

She said: “We were devastated, but the prognosis was positive. The oncology and fertility consultants worked with us to ensure I could have some eggs removed, and we had our embryos frozen. Post chemotherapy, we had to wait two years until we could have the embryos implanted. We had two unsuccessful attempts of IVF. 

For the next six months we took a long needed holiday and took the opportunity to consider our future as a family and we agreed to continue to explore the option of adoption.”

Marcia and her husband were approved through PACT and became parents to two sisters, aged one and two at the time. 

“We were really lucky, the girls took to us and their new home immediately. All the preparation work and transition went really well and they could just get on with being children.”

Marcia is a wonderful example of someone who has created her family through adoption after cancer. And in a society where there are three times as many children waiting than there are approved parents we do need more people to consider adoption. So don’t let cancer be the reason you don’t think about it. Every single application to adopt will need to be considered on an individual basis so do get in touch if you’d like to know more.

About PACT

Parents And Children Together (PACT) is an independent adoption charity and family support provider which last year placed 93 children with 64 PACT families through its adoption services. It is rated outstanding by Ofsted and provides award-winning adoption support to its families for life.

PACT is one of 34 voluntary adoption agencies in the UK which find, assess, approve and support adoptive parents. VAAs work in partnership with local authorities to find homes for children in care who are unable to stay with their birth families. To find out more about adoption visit www.pactcharity.org or to find a VAA local to you visit www.cvaa.org.uk

Emma Owen

Emma Owen

Emma Owen is PACT’s Head of Marketing and Communications.

Our craziest ‘cures’ for cancer

In this post, blog editor Caroline demystifies some of the wackiest ‘cures’ for cancer that have appeared on our radar recently.


Cancer is difficult for everyone. When you tell someone that you have cancer, they might not know what to say. After overcoming their initial shock, many people’s first instinct is to want to help. Sometimes help comes in the form of a hug, or a casserole – but often it can come as an ill-advised miracle treatment from the depths of the internet. Who knows where your friend or neighbour read this information? Are they even certain that it applies to your type of cancer? Chances are, you probably weren’t looking for a miracle cure and a huge Amazon shopping list when you shared the news either. When we share our medical history, most of us are probably hoping for some quiet understanding – and it can be frustrating and hurtful to be given dubious healthcare advice instead.

At our Great Escape retreat, we run a workshop that encourages young adults with cancer to engage critically with news stories and homespun ‘truths’ about cures for cancer. We discuss everything from apricot kernels to naked mole rats, and look at ways to check the authenticity of any alleged cancer ‘cure’. We often find that the stories doing the rounds lack rigorous scientific evidence, or the findings of one small study have been incorrectly extrapolated and interpreted by non-specialists. Or the proposed treatment does have some benefits – in mice.

We asked our Shine community to share the craziest ‘cures’ for cancer that they’d heard recently – and here’s what they told us.

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When life gives you lemons…

Lemons

Maybe that famous saying should be ‘When life gives you cancer, make lemonade’, as so many members of our Shine community recall being told by well-meaning folk that lemons are the secret cure for cancer. According to one chain letter that keeps doing the rounds, ‘blend a whole lemon fruit with a cup of hot water and drinking it for about 1-3 months first thing before food and your cancer will disappear’! Well… it won’t.

Tropical fruit

Not keen on citrus? That might not be a problem! We’ve been told that pineapple, dragon fruit, ‘papayas… all the papayas’, and noni fruit are five-star cancer slayers. Unfortunately, munching your way through a pile of notoriously stinky noni fruit will not cure your cancer. There’s no evidence that pineapple, dragon fruit, or papaya will either. As the American Institute of Cancer Research points out, ‘no single food or food component can protect you against cancer itself’. If someone tries to convince you otherwise, you might like to point them in the direction of US cancer hospital Memorial Sloan Kettering’s excellent resource About Herbs or Cancer Research UK’s diet and cancer information pages. Always check with your doctor before making any major changes to your diet.

Crystals and moon beads

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Crystals for external use only

One Shine member was told that she could cure her cancer by using special beads that are supercharged by the moon! And have you heard the one about crystals? Opal won’t cure your cancer (or ‘remove all the cancer-causing negative energy from your house’, as a young cancer patient friend of ours was told), but crystals of a different kind have proved vital in modern cancer research. Best to enjoy minerals like rose quartz and malachite as decoration, though.

Dog wormer

In April 2019, a lung cancer patient in the US hit the headlines when he proclaimed that dog-worming drug fenbendazole had cured his metastatic disease – which is probably why we’ve heard about it from our Shine community recently. The internet is awash with tales of self-medication for advanced cancer, and at least one study of the effect of fenbendazole on cancer cells has been carried out. Crucially, however, there have been no clinical trials on cancer patients as yet and thus its effectiveness remains unproven.  Don’t go rushing to Pets At Home this afternoon!

Taxi drivers

Not one, but two Shine members told us that taxi drivers had personally intervened to ‘cure’ their cancer!

‘He clasps my hand and absolutely goes “into one”. I am talking full-on, TV-show-style mega prayer, calling the spirit of [insert religious icon of your choice] to help rid me of cancer. This went on for a few minutes and I was so stunned I just sat there. He’d had the good grace to turn the meter off.

Anyway, he’s calling everyone under the sun down to channel through him and into my body (creepy!) and rid me of cancer. Then, just when I thought we were done (I’m still holding my hand awkwardly in his), he says this:

“Cancer… GO!”

I mean, all of a sudden, he shouts “cancer… GO!” so loudly that it actually makes me jump and squeal.

Then he turns to me, gives me back my hand, and smiles sweetly as he says “there, you are cured.”’

Unsurprisingly, we don’t have an explanation for this one. Nor do we have any evidence that it works.

The truth is out there

It’s not all citrus fruit and Uber drivers. We also heard from young people who had been told that they could cure their cancer through things like veganism (one of our vegan members was told that she must have been ‘doing veganism wrong!’), wheatgrass, and foraging for mushrooms in Regent’s Park. And somehow we’ve managed to reach the end of this blog post without mentioning everyone’s favourite super cruciferous, kale.

So what can you do when someone tells you that they know exactly what to do in order to treat your cancer? If they’re your doctor, lean in. If they aren’t? You might want to direct them to this excellent infographic that clearly explains the difference between relative risk and absolute risk – and shows why your bangers and mash is unlikely to kill you. There are some excellent resources available for people who wish to understand more about the science behind the headlines. You might like to check out Sense About Science, the Cancer Research UK Science Blog, or Quackwatch – a doctor-led website that has been busting myths and outing quacks since 1997.

Ask for evidence, do your own research, and remember to talk to your medical team before making any diet or lifestyle changes. And if you’ve had to bust a cancer myth recently, let us know in the comments!

 

Lemon slices photo by Nery Montenegro on Unsplash

Crystals photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

The lowdown on benefits entitlement

In this guest blog post Tom Messere, Online Benefits Advisor at Maggie’s Cancer Care, introduces social security entitlements and benefits that can make a real difference to people of working age who are affected by cancer. This blog is adapted from the first of four for all ages available at maggiescentres.org.


Cancer brings extra costs: trips to hospital, keeping warm at home, additional food costs, new clothes if your size changes or if you need surgery, and even the odd well-deserved treat when feeling a bit fed up.

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Money can be tough when cancer is diagnosed. But benefits are there to help.

For those of working age, a long period of sickness – or time out if you are a carer – can also start reducing income, as even the best sick pay/insurance doesn’t last forever.

A Macmillan report found:

  • four in five people experience a negative financial effect of an average £550 a month
  • 30% also experience a loss in income of an average £860 a month

Claiming your entitlements can make a real difference. The problem with benefits is not the fraud that’s highlighted in the media (DWP put this at 0.7% of total spending). Rather, there’s a much bigger, more hidden issue of people not claiming what they should (estimates suggest some £25 billion a year). Don’t let that be you!

Barriers to benefits

There are many reasons why people miss out: not knowing which benefits might apply, ruling themselves out, hearing negative messages about claiming, or just finding the process too complicated. Others do claim, but may be wrongly turned down or underpaid.

There is a particular low take-up for means-tested benefits (due to extra complications and intrusiveness around finances) and disability benefits (linked to ‘well, I sort-of manage so I can’t apply’).

Hopefully this blog will encourage you to feel less overwhelmed, and enable you to seek out free, confidential advice.

Benefit myths

A cancer diagnosis doesn’t automatically qualify you for a benefit. Health-related benefits depend on treatment plans or an assessment of the difficulties you experience, and cancer-related issues can be hard to put into words. However, many people with cancer find they can claim something, particularly if they have assistance with their application.

You might get both a sickness and a disability benefit if you are too unwell to work much. As you recover you can do some work while still getting sickness benefits, but as you do more, these may stop. Disability benefits can carry on – even in full time work – for example if you are still experiencing late effects of cancer or treatments.

Some benefits do involve a financial assessment, but the majority do not. Even when finances are an issue, entitlement can go higher up the income scale than you might think.

But what if there are others who need the money more than me?

It’s quite possible that there will be others that need financial support more than you – and others who might need it less. Yet you may all qualify, perhaps at different rates. Benefits do not come out of a fixed pot, so you getting an award – or selflessly not claiming – has no effect on another person’s chances.

If I claim benefits, am I a charity case? Have I lost my independence?

It can be hard to claim benefits, especially with a lot of negative media coverage and political discussion. However, modern social security started at the same time as the NHS and was based on the same principles of ‘all being in this together’. You pay in over the years (your ‘contribution’) – and continue to do so while claiming – to get the financial and medical help when you need it. Think of a claim as the same as house or car insurance – all ways of sharing the risk.

But isn’t the benefits system impossibly complicated?

Benefits can feel like a maze at times. But with some information and advice it is far from impossible to make a successful claim.

Three steps to full entitlement

The benefits system can seem really tricky but it might help to think about applying for financial support in three stages.

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The benefits system can seem really complex – but there are ways that you can get through it!

First, consider the basic non-means-tested benefits to replace earnings from work, when either you can’t earn at all or can only earn a little (e.g. when easing back into work after treatment).

These benefits include Statutory Sick Pay (SSP), Contributory Employment and Support Allowance (C-ESA), and Carer’s Allowance (for carers). They are also called ‘overlapping benefits’ as you might qualify for several but can only usually receive the highest.

Ask yourself: can I qualify? Which benefit is best for me? Is it ever worth claiming more than one?

Second, look at means-tested benefits and tax credits. These benefits:

  • Guarantee a basic minimum income either instead of SSP and C-ESA or as a top-up, e.g. income-related ESA when off sick or Income Support for carers.
  • Help with specific costs, e.g. children, rent, council tax, or health costs.
  • Can provide extra support to those in work. You can do some work while on ESA and then move on to Working Tax Credit when you can do more.

Big changes are afoot with means-tested benefits, as many of the benefits mentioned above are merging into Universal Credit (UC). Both systems run alongside each other until December 2023.

Ask yourself: Do I claim ‘legacy benefits’ or UC? And if I have a choice, which system works best for me? Am I claiming all the ones that apply? Have they got the sums right to include extra amounts relevant to me?

Third, consider other non-means tested benefits that can help with extra costs of daily living and getting around. Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is the main one in working age that can often apply after a cancer diagnosis. It is always non-means-tested, payable in or out of work and on top of any other benefits. It allows a carer to claim Carer’s Allowance and is ignored as income in means-tested benefits sums. Sometimes it can even increase entitlement to those benefits!

PIP is hugely underclaimed. It can be straightforward in many advanced cancers, but claims can be puzzling for the majority of people with cancer who face the full assessment. Expressing the difficulties that go with cancer can feel tricky, as they often don’t stop you doing things, but do make everything feel harder.

Ask yourself: Might I get PIP? Can I talk to an advisor before beginning an application? Can I look at other disability benefits, if my cancer might be linked to work history or service in the armed forces?

Benefits are not handouts, and you are entitled

A cancer diagnosis doesn’t guarantee benefits, but it makes some quite likely. Savings or a partner’s income might rule out some help, but never all help. It will be very rare for a Benefits Advisor to find nothing to support you.

Benefits can really help with the cost of cancer but myths, concerns and some media/political debate can all discourage claims. Add in worries about the process involved, reduced energy, and some dodgy decisions, and billions go unclaimed each year. Claiming helps you save NHS and social services resources too. Please don’t miss out!

You can find out more on all of the benefits mentioned and how to apply via further blogs and forums available at Maggie’s Community.

Good luck, and never knowingly underclaim!

 

If you would like to contact Tom and seek further benefits advice or support, you can do so via the dedicated area in the Maggie’s Community forums.

Getting the most out of your medical appointments: more tips from a Consultant Oncologist

 

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Meet Richard!

Following on from his last blog post about preparing to meet your oncologist, Consultant Oncologist Richard Simcock writes about the best way to start a consultation with your doctor – and ways you can follow up afterwards.

 

 

 

 


Signposting

If you go to a show you normally know what you’re going to see. Have you ever seen a film or play where you literally knew nothing at all about it before it started? You were likely to have been initially bewildered as you got your bearings. Arriving at a consultation knowing what to expect means less confusion: it allows you to get straight to the substance. It is good practice for a healthcare professional to explain the purpose of the meeting (‘Today I want to explain your radiotherapy treatment’ etc.), but that isn’t always the case.

A reasonable question to ask is ‘What are you hoping to discuss today?’ This also gives you an opportunity to highlight any areas that you know that you want to cover and leads to better time prioritisation. If a follow-up meeting is being arranged, then asking ‘what would you expect us to discuss at our next meeting?’ leads to even better preparation.

Ask for Copies

After almost every clinic consultation a letter will be written. These letters have multiple purposes: they inform the referring clinician, they may be a request (e.g. ‘please prescribe drug X’), and they also act as a record of the meeting (much better than a scrawled note in undecipherable handwriting!).

Eighteen years ago, the NHS plan recommended ‘patients should as of right receive copies of all correspondence between health professionals about their care.’ This was enshrined in the 2015 NHS Constitution. Copies of letters written about you will be sent automatically in most cases. If you’re unsure whether and how this happens, it’s reasonable to check just in case it isn’t yet routine for the doctor you are seeing: ‘Will you send me a copy of the letter you send to my doctor?’

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Try filing your own notes

Not every patient wants their letters, and if you wish not to receive a copy you should make that clear too, in case letters are sent automatically.

In my opinion, far better is a letter written to the patient first and foremost. This should avoid issues with jargon and misunderstanding, but it’s also a part of patient-centred decision-making. The Academy of Royal Colleges recently produced a report (‘Please Write to Me’)  with a  ‘How to..’ document for doctors around writing directly to patients, and I’m hopeful that this will become increasingly standard practice.

You are entitled to copies of results and reports too. This can be problematic as these are almost always written in the dense jargon of the specialty. Breast Cancer Care produces a guide to understanding a breast cancer pathology report and there are other online resources for other cancers. Asking for a summary of what the report means is very reasonable, but asking for a tutorial on the meaning of every word may not be the best use of precious consultation time. As we move to a time where patients will (hopefully) be able to access more of their own data via portals, medical specialists will need to produce more readable report summaries.

Key worker

You should be allocated a ‘key worker’ – this will most often be a clinical nurse specialist (CNS). Many CNS are highly expert in their field and will know answers to all the common questions, and most of the complicated ones too. They can be invaluable in helping you navigate what is happening before, during, and after a consultation. They will often help patients ‘debrief’, particularly if a clinic meeting has been complicated or upsetting. Key workers are there to act as your advocate and help you to get the best, most personalised care. If you know that you have a lot of questions to ask, then first flag this with your key worker before a meeting: your key worker will be able to answer many questions for you, as well as prepare the doctors in the clinic and potentially organise a longer slot.

Macmillan helps to support over 4300 CNS in the NHS and yet we know there are still inadequate numbers. This means not all patients will get the CNS/key worker access they need or deserve. It is always reasonable to ask ‘Do I have a key worker/CNS? And how can I get hold of them if I have questions?’

Occasionally, a doctor-patient relationship is not good.  Communication will be poor as a result. Every doctor can have a bad day when they perform less well, but if you think you are not able to have a good meeting with a doctor attached to your care then this is an issue that your key worker should be able to handle sensitively. Key workers can often help by arranging another member of the team to see you where possible.

Second (and third and fourth) opinions

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Your case is reviewed by multiple doctors

It is standard within the NHS that all newly diagnosed cancer cases are discussed by a multidisciplinary team of professionals. I attend two of these meetings a week. In the Head and Neck cancer meeting, I sit with two other oncologists, a consultant radiologist and pathologist, three specialist nurses, three dieticians, two speech and language therapists, a consultant dentist, a specialist radiographer, and six consultant surgeons and trainees. We discuss every case, and multiple different approaches to the patient’s problem. Later in clinic we will meet the patient and present a summary view. The ‘first opinion’ is often the combination of multiple expert opinions.

You might want to ask ‘Has my case been discussed at the MDT and were any other options discussed?’. This might be particularly important if there are different possible treatments.

Records of the MDT discussion are also available.

Despite these multiple opinions you may still feel that you would like another team to consider your case. A second opinion can be arranged by your treating team (hospital to hospital) but the mechanisms by which hospitals get paid mean that it is often preferred if the request for another opinion comes from your GP. Transferring clinical information and the masses of data contained within scans can now usually be achieved instantly and electronically. Be aware that another opinion will inevitably lengthen the time before treatment can be delivered.

Research and Trials

Research in cancer is vital to drive innovation and improve survival. Clinical centres that engage in research may produce better results (this has been shown in recent radiotherapy trials), perhaps through more detailed systems of quality assurance.

You may be offered the opportunity to take part in a clinical trial, but if you are not then a good question to ask is ‘Are there any clinical trials for my situation in this hospital?’

If there are no local trials then looking at the National Cancer Research Institute website and their Portfolio Maps for a specific cancer will show what important questions investigators have about treating that disease.

If trials are not available locally it is helpful to ask if there are other accessible centres that are running relevant research. This information will usually be available to your team although you will have to consider carefully if the promise of a trial justifies the burden of travel to a centre further away from home.

Conclusion

There is a whole science devoted to analysing different styles of doctor-patient communication and ultimately doctors want the meetings with their patients to be effective, efficient, and friendly.

‘Communication’ has a double meaning – it can also mean a connection between places, a route or a bridge. Good communication should be able to take you somewhere new: bring you to a new point of awareness or knowledge. I hope these tips help you make the best use of those vital minutes, so you have maximum opportunity to arrive at the best possible destination of understanding.

Richard tweets as @BreastDocUK. He is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at the Sussex Cancer Centre. 

Dancing through cancer: how a new project is helping women with cancer

In a special guest post Emily Jenkins, founder of Move Dance Feel, introduces her project and writes about the work she does to support women living with cancer.


I love to dance. Be it in my kitchen, on the train platform, or (more appropriately) at a festival, I like to move. Why? Because it brings release, it’s revitalising, and it eases tensions in my mind and body. Dancing helps me to breathe better, sleep better, and feel more alive.

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Emily Jenkins

We are all capable of dancing, despite the self-conscious mind telling us otherwise. Far too often people concern themselves with the aesthetics of dance: how it looks, rather than how it feels.

I work with different  groups in community and arts contexts, and in recent years have specialised in an area known as Dance and Health. Using dance in health contexts is not a new phenomenon, though due to greater recognition of its benefits and connection to wellbeing it is rapidly growing in popularity.

My job is to break down preconceived ideas of what dance is, and inspire people to move in a way that feels good for them. I use creative techniques that encourage a greater understanding of and appreciation for the body, focusing on self-expression. Through shared, positive experiences, dance can promote social cohesion and help to build meaningful relationships based on trust and understanding.

Dance is a multifaceted art form which very much accommodates the multidimensional needs of people. In contrast to Western medicine, which often compartmentalises illness, dancing addresses the whole body, which in turn acknowledges the whole being – physically, mentally, and emotionally. This can have transformative effects on participants, as they get to know a part of themselves perhaps previously overlooked.

In 2016 I launched a project in East London, Move Dance Feel, providing free weekly dance and movement sessions for women affected by cancer. I established the project to explore what dance could offer in the context of cancer recovery, and to address a recognised need for post-treatment support.

My first personal encounter with cancer was in my teens, as I witnessed my grandfather wrestle with the devastating effects of melanoma. I recall visiting him shortly before he died and being very affected by how much the disease had taken him over. The image of his emaciated frame had a profound impact on me. Over time, as I supported friends living with cancer, I particularly noticed the overwhelming effects on the body, and also the mind.

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Move Dance Feel session

A motivation for setting up Move Dance Feel was learning that 70% of people affected by cancer report negative physical, emotional, and mental side effects between 1 and 10 years after treatment – a statistic that I found very hard to digest. At the same time, I read that physical activity proved effective in reducing the negative side effects of cancer treatment, as well as reducing the risk of reoccurrence, so I was puzzled as to why dance wasn’t being offered.

Originating at a community centre in Bromley-By-Bow with a Macmillan Social Prescribing Service, Move Dance Feel is now running in three cancer support organisations across London, providing sessions at Maggie’s Barts and Paul’s Cancer Support Centre as well. The project is for adult women (18+) with any type of cancer, including those who are supporting someone with cancer. We welcome people at different stages in their journey (pre, during and post treatment) and no prior dance experience is necessary. Participants are also welcome to bring along a female friend.

At the heart of Move Dance Feel is artistic practice, where women come together to dance instead of talk about their cancer. They meet each week to be active, creative and, most importantly, to laugh and have fun.

My favourite aspect of the project is meeting other women. As a communicative art form, dance provides insight into people’s characters and enables intimate moments of exchange. More often than not, these moments are energised and playful, but they can also be nurturing and grounding in times of instability. The nature of this exchange helps to experience a sense of belonging and can lead to feelings of self-discovery, learning from others how to help ourselves.

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Dancing at Move Dance Feel

My aim is to integrate dance as a permanent offer within cancer care programmes, and further evidence of its need within the public health sector. I am also in the process of setting up a performance element of Move Dance Feel to bring a sense of visibility to women who are living well during and after cancer – in the hope of inspiring others to dance (even if it’s alone in your kitchen!).


Emily will be running a taster session at our Shine Connect 2019 conference (11th May 2019). To register your interest in the conference and be notified when registration opens, click here!

If you’d like to know more about Move Dance Feel, or let others know it’s available for them, please follow Emily on Facebook or Twitter.

You can also find Emily at www.emily-jenkins.com.

Photos taken by Camilla Greenwell, www.camillagreenwellphotography.com. 

Taking care: How and why ‘carers’ also need support

A few years ago, the partners of a couple of Shine members approached us about starting a ‘Plus Ones’ group. Having cancer is tough, they noted – but so is supporting someone with cancer. We started our Plus Ones group online and it’s continued to grow over the years. As we’ve worked more on supporting the supporters, we’ve also learned more about the issues that they can face.

In this blog, Dr. Jason Spendelow (one of Shine’s original Plus Ones) outlines some of the issues that ‘carers’ often face when supporting someone with a life-limiting illness. We know a lot of Plus Ones don’t consider themselves carers (78%, according to a recent survey that Shine carried out!) but we hope this gives you some insight into the support that someone looking after a young adult with cancer might need.


 

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Those who provide significant levels of care to another person are more than twice as likely to suffer from poor health than non-carers.

While carers do report many positive experiences, the physical and psychological wellbeing of this group is often compromised due to the stress associated with the support they provide. Those who provide significant levels of care to another person are more than twice as likely to suffer from poor health than non-carers (Carers UK, 2004). When asked directly, the vast majority (84%) of carers said that caring had a negative impact on their health (Carers UK 2013). Carer wellbeing, then, is a particularly important topic in cancer and other chronic illnesses. Carers provide a huge amount of support to loved ones affected by these illnesses. This means it is even more crucial that we take care of the carers.

Mental & Physical Health

We have an increasingly large pile of research available on carer wellbeing. From this, we know that psychological issues are among the most commonly reported difficulties amongst carers (Stenberg et al 2010). An important concept here is ‘carer burden’, which refers to negative emotional experiences that occur from providing care. The level of carer burden varies from person to person, with higher levels of burden being linked to female carers, living with the care receiver, spending large amounts of time caring, being socially isolated, under financial stress, and having no choice in becoming a carer (Adelman et al 2014).

Carers can experience a range of psychological difficulties. Some of the most common issues tend to be low mood and depressive symptoms, elevated levels of stress and anxiety, and lower quality of life (see for example, Braun et al 2007; Pinquart 2017, and Easter, Sharpe and Hunt 2015). Rates of depressive and/or anxiety disorders are higher amongst adult carers when compared to the general population. These figures do not mean that you are destined to develop such psychological issues, but carers are clearly more vulnerable. In late 2016, Shine carried out a survey of Plus Ones and found that 58% had experienced stress, and 77% had experienced anxiety.

Workshop photo 1

Shine’s first Plus One workshop covered how to cope with anxiety.

In addition to psychological difficulties, carers can experience decline in their overall physical health. Physical health problems vary and range from fatigue to insomnia, headache and gastrointestinal issues (Jassem et al 2015).

Positive Experiences

Despite the physical and psychological challenges discussed above, many carers can also identify positive aspects of their experience. Some of the reported positive experiences included being able to give back to someone, knowing the person is being well cared for, improved relationships, personal growth, and an enhanced sense of meaning or purpose (American Psychological Association 2018). Finding meaning and purpose is an experience reported across several groups of carers (Carers UK 2004). Being able to help is a source of satisfaction for many carers, while ‘giving back’ to someone and having an equal or reciprocal relationship are other positive outcomes (Spendelow, Adam and Fairhurst 2017; Buchanan et al 2009), Ribeiro and Paul 2008). The relevance to wellbeing is that experiencing positives from caring help people to cope better with the stress that comes their way.

Taking care of yourself

Your wellbeing is influenced by many factors. Believing that just one ‘thing’ is the cause of any experienced psychological difficulties is usually inaccurate and unhelpful. Attempts to improve your wellbeing, therefore, usually involves taking several factors into consideration. Look, I could bang on here about all the things you know you should be doing already: getting plenty of sleep, exercising, and eating vegetables. Yes, this is all true and fundamental to your health. But I won’t repeat the same advice given millions of times already.

Perhaps a more useful strategy is to ask ‘What barriers stop you from taking better care of yourself?’ and, more importantly, ‘What can you do about these barriers?’. Some barriers are physical: for instance, you don’t think you have time to look after yourself. Other barriers are psychological. For example, some carers feel that it is selfish to prioritise themselves over the loved one they support. Asking what barriers exist (and why) helps work out what might have gone wrong with previous failed attempts to take better care of yourself. These barriers need to be directly addressed, otherwise it doesn’t matter how many times you are told to go for a walk and eat some broccoli.

It may be that you need to discuss this issue with a sensible person that you trust in order to make progress with your wellbeing. Having said this, here are a few questions you can ponder to get you thinking more about barriers to better self-care:

  • What emotions might you experience if you put more time into self-care?
  • Why do you think you would experience those particular emotions?
  • What do these emotions say about your attitude to self-care?
  • What would have to change in your life to result in more time given to your wellbeing?
  • How might the wellbeing of the person you support be negatively affected if you spent more time looking after yourself?
  • What would be the worse thing someone could say about you as a carer? How does that influence your self-care?

 The Bottom Line

Carer wellbeing matters, both to the quality of life of the carer, and the wellbeing of the loved one that the carer supports. To cope with the huge challenges brought about by cancer, you need to be thinking of self-care strategies that are positive and sustainable over the long-term. If you fall over, both you and the person you care for will find things even tougher. Thinking about barriers to self-care can be a useful way to better understand your current approach to your health, and how you can improve it.

Jason is a clinical psychologist with a special interest working with people and their carers affected by chronic illness and disability. He also supported his wife through cancer. He runs his practice in Surrey. See more at www.jasonspendelow.com

To join our Shine Plus One Facebook group, click here. To join the mailing list for Shine Plus One events, please email plusone@shinecancersupport.org.

 

Looking for a job after cancer

In the second of two blog posts on looking for work after cancer, recruitment consultant Ash Holmes answers some of the questions that were put to him via our private Facebook group. If you’re looking for work, make sure to check out his original post too. And good luck!


 

How should I deal with gaps in my CV? I don’t want the time I took off for treatment etc. to be seen as a red flag to an employer.working after cancer

This is probably the hardest question to answer as there are so many variables, and it will depend on your individual circumstances and how open you wish to be.

If you’re returning from a career break, no matter how long or short, it is best to at least address it in some way on your CV. Don’t leave it up to the individual reading your CV to wonder and draw their own conclusions.

Depending on how open you plan to be, simply putting ‘career break due to personal reasons, happy to discuss during a call/interview’ could be enough to stop a potential employer from wondering and instead focus on the rest of your CV and application.

Wording here is very important! As a reader, the difference between ‘personal issues’ and ‘personal reasons’ is huge. Try to think carefully about any language you use and avoid sounding negative. Ask for a second opinion, and get someone else to read through your CV.

If you do not want to talk about your reasons for having a break, then simply putting ‘career break’ with the relevant dates is still better than leaving a gap. By being transparent and addressing any empty spaces head-on, it stops any reader from trying to guess what’s happened. This is your chance to ‘control’ the reader’s impression.

Most recruiters and hiring managers will make a quick judgement about a CV, and finding an extended gap between dates is often one of the first things that they will want to ask about. Bearing that in mind, it’s important for you to be able to provide a reason for the career break, even if you are not going to talk about cancer. People take career breaks for a number of reasons, including: concentrating on family/a hobby or passion, feeling they have achieved everything they wanted and needing time to consider the next step, the end of a contract, or a change in circumstances (professional or personal) that meant they did not want to rush into a new position.

Where can I find good examples of CVs for different types of jobs?

For all CVs, there are core principles to be followed:

  • Make it clear and easy to read (do not try and fill every bit of white space with boxes of text)
  • Be concise (the ‘two pages’ rule is a good guideline, but it’s only a guideline!)
  • Make sure the content is relevant to the position you are applying for (you might need to create a few different versions of your CV)
  • Make sure key information is clear and well positioned (name and contact details at the top)
  • Don’t be afraid to use bold, underline, italics, or bullet points to emphasise information
  • Triple-check for grammar and spelling – and ask a friend to check it
  • If you are speaking to a recruitment consultant, ask for their advice

It’s useful also to consider the standards in your industry. A web designer might create their own website with examples of their previous work, for example, or a graphic designer might have a portfolio.

If you have recommendations on LinkedIn, you might want to include a link to your profile in your CV. If you are wondering how to ask for recommendations on LinkedIn, one of the most effective ways is to complete a recommendation for someone else. Once accepted, they might complete one without asking. Alternatively, explain that you are returning to work and that you would really appreciate a recommendation.LinkedIn

Professional CV writers do exist, but I would be very wary about paying anyone money. You will likely receive similar advice to that which you can already find online. The majority of job boards also have blog posts and CV templates readily available.

You can find a sample of my CV at the end of this blog.

Should I mention my cancer in an interview? What’s the best approach to mentioning time off without scaring employers?

First of all, it’s important to note that you are not obliged to disclose a cancer diagnosis and it is actually illegal for an employer to ask about your health in an interview. Once you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, you’re covered by the Equalities Act 2010 which provides legal protection against discrimination relating to employment, including during the recruitment process.

Having said that, whether you want to mention your cancer diagnosis is your choice. Personally, I think you need to focus on why you are the right person for the job, what you can bring, and how it will be beneficial for the employer/hiring manager. If you are going to discuss your illness, it is probably better to bring it up in person, during a later stage interview. Here, you can gauge a potential employers’ reaction and reassure them of your capability to do the role – and by this point, you already have your foot in the door. You can also control the conversation by providing relevant information and answering any questions.

When your cancer experience is relevant to your job and could be beneficial (in that it provides a useful perspective), how should you bring it up? I don’t want to present a sob story!

Dream jobIf you feel something is relevant and it will help you to be better at your job… mention it! Sell your strengths/experiences. Here is where a cover letter on an initial application might be the right approach. Just saying ‘I’ve had cancer’ isn’t enough: you need to explain why and how that will make you better at the job.

If you think your cancer experience could provide you with a ‘competitive advantage’ over other candidates, then maximise it! Don’t discount your experience and what you’ve learned through it.

Should I Google myself when I’m looking for work? Will an employer do this? What kind of stuff do they look for?

Some employers will carry out a Google search and social media check, and some won’t. It will often depend on the type of role and industry. Is the role public-facing, for example? Does it involve work with young or vulnerable people? It is always best to be on the safe side and use common sense. Here is where a professional profile, such as LinkedIn, can help you to present the best impression.

For some roles, employers will carry out police background checks, but they must ask your permission before doing this.

If you are concerned about your online image, there are often ways to make your social media profiles private. Do a quick Google search to find out how to do this for each specific platform. Many teachers, for example, change their name on social media to make it harder for pupils or parents to find them.

What’s the best way to look for a new job? Should I go online? What can a recruiter offer me?

The best approach is to combine online and offline activity. Reach out to former colleagues, friends, and acquaintances – anyone in your network who may be able to help. Hiring managers are more willing to talk on the phone or offer an interview after a personal recommendation, and if you talk to people you know then you may also hear about jobs before they have been advertised online. The process can feel less formal and more relaxed, helping you to demonstrate your skills and ability.

A huge part of the recruitment process is online, with a drive to make the process automated in many industries. Job boards are the best place to start. There are several main boards that cover a number of industries and experience levels (Indeed, CV Library, Total Jobs, Jobsite, Reed, and Monster). Alongside these are more specialised job boards. Do a Google (other search engines are available) search to find yours.

A large proportion of recruitment agencies and employers are now posting their roles on LinkedIn, so make sure you set up an account and take look.

Remember that applying via a job board or careers website is just the first stage. To stand out, it is important to follow-up via a call or email. Don’t be afraid to use social media to your advantage: if you know the hiring manager’s or recruiter’s name, add them on LinkedIn. Or ask the company for an update via Twitter!

Unfortunately, now that we have automation and most recruitment processes are online, receiving a generic rejection email is common. From May 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force. This means that you can request any application to be reviewed by a human instead of through automation.

Contacting a recruiter can be a great way to learn more about market conditions, industry-specific job boards, suitable roles, realistic earning potential, and which employers are more flexible with employees than others. The key to building a relationship with a recruiter is to do your research and make sure that they are working in the relevant industry to you.

A word of caution though: recruiters are sales people. Some will be very helpful and answer your questions, but others won’t – especially if they do not feel that they will be able to place you into a role.

Feel free to contact me on LinkedIn to see if I can recommend a recruiter based on your career goals/background.

Ash Holmes has spent the last seven years working in the recruitment industry. As well as working with thousands of candidates, Ash has created and delivered employability training to college students and individuals who are not in work, education or employment.  Ash has placed candidates with organisations as varied as Red Bull, Olympus KeyMed, Tottenham Hotspur, and Red Gate Software. He is more than happy to answer any follow-up questions and connect on LinkedIn.

Here’s a sample CV – Ashley Holmes

Borough, London, SE1

E: example@e.com. M: +44 (0) 00000 0000000

L: http://linkedin.com/in/ashholmes14

An experienced operations and marketing professional with over 7 years’ experience within the recruitment industry. Looking for a role and organisation to be able to continue my development, expand my experience and match my ambition. I have recently returned from spending a month in North America and am now looking for a new role.

I bring a wide range of experience and skills to the role including:

  • Strategy
  • Communication
  • Change management
  • Systems and process
  • Project management
  • Marketing & social media, including ress
  • Internal recruitment
  • Third-party management (suppliers, etc.)
  • Sales & account management
  • Training

As part of my personal development I completed a Level 6 Diploma in Professional Marketing from the Chartered Institute of Marketing in January 2017. The Diploma has helped me to understand the role that marketing plays within business, study key business-focused modules including Change Management, and to view marketing from a much more strategic position.

Employment History

Etonwood Ltd. (UK)

September 2017 – November 2017

Operations Director

Brought in to put in place the systems, process, and policies to help the organisation double in size. Implemented:

  • Trainee & senior attraction & interview process
  • On-boarding process & creation of ‘Welcome to Etonwood’ book
  • Mapped career progression & formalised job descriptions
  • Put in place appraisal process based on the above
  • First stages of GDPR policy
  • Created brand guidelines
  • Created social media strategy & reached over 100,000 LinkedIn impressions from 0
  • Put in place all health and safety policies

Raw Talent Academy Ltd. (UK)

May 2011 – August 2017

Operations, Marketing & Recruitment Manager

Joined as first full-time employee. The role evolved as the organisation grew to include marketing, operations, and finally managing the recruitment team.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Member of the Senior Management Team providing input on company-wide strategy
  • Creation & implementation of Marketing strategy to drive B2B lead generation & candidate attraction in line with company objectives
  • Marketing & Operations budget
  • Management of team of three recruitment consultants & one administrator – increased delivery from 73% (H1 2016) to 123% (H2 2016)
  • Account-managed two key accounts
  • Project-managed rebrand and launch of new website (launched 2017)
  • Project-managed development of a Digital Recruitment Assessment tool (SiD Digital)
  • Management of IT & processes, including: CRM/ATS, Office365, Data Recovery, IT support
  • Managed key external/supplier relationships (CRM, developers, graphic design, video creation, job boards)
  • Contracts, terms and policies (employee contracts, Health & Safety, etc.)
  • Press releases & award entries – existing relationships with recruitment industry journalists and publications, as well as some national publications.

Key Skills:

  • Microsoft Office
  • Adobe Photoshop, InDesign
  • iMovie
  • Basic HTML

 

MarketMaker4 (UK)

Technology Company

March 2011 – May 2011

Consultant

 

Travelling in Australia

January 2010 – February 2011

 

RightNow Technologies Inc. (Australia)

International Information Technology Company

April – December 2009

Assistant to Marketing Manager APAC / Business Development Representative APAC

Key Responsibilities:

  • The building and purging of customer and prospect databases to ensure the correct contact is listed along with correct contact details
  • Arranging and organising events for, and in partnership with, the Marketing Manager to ensure customers and prospects have a positive customer experience at the events
  • Helped in the development of and provided feedback regarding Marketing campaigns so that they have the maximum impact and highest response rates
  • Engaging with customers and prospects in the run-up to company events to encourage attendance
  • Identifying and contacting prospect and target accounts to create business opportunities

Foodnet Ltd. (UK)

International Food Trading and Production Company

June 2008 – March 2009

Purchasing and Sales Admin

Education

The Chartered Institute of Marketing (UK)

November 2015 – January 2017

Level 6 Diploma in Professional Marketing

Modules; Strategic Marketing, Marketing Metrics, Driving Innovation

Chesham High School (UK)

September 2006 – April 2008

3 A-Levels A-D

Amersham School (UK)

September 2001 – June 2006

9 GCSE’s A-C

Interests

Sport and music are my two main passions. I am a keen runner and have completed three marathons to date (London, Paris and Nice to Cannes). I also regularly attend live music.

References available on request.