young adult cancer conference

Getting connected

In 2016, Shine decided to go large and hold our first annual conference. With close to 100 people in attendance, it was a great day and for 2017 we decided to go bigger and better! Shine Connect was held on 20th May in London and was designed as a way for young adults from across the country to come together and connect for a day. With expert speakers and much more, it’s now one of our favourite events, and this year 120 people joined us. Take a read of Jen’s blog about the day – and get set to join us next year!


Connect 1I’m not sure there are many – in fact any – other cancer conferences that combine singing and cute dogs with dating advice and frank discussions about sex and relationships. And that’s what makes Shine Connect unique!

Shine supports a diverse group of young adults in their 20s, 30s and 40s with the unfortunate commonality of having had a diagnosis of cancer. Our needs differ vastly from the older cancer demographic and Shine Connect, Shine’s annual conference, works to address those needs. It is a conference both for young adults with cancer and for healthcare professionals looking to better support young adults with cancer.

Following an introduction from Shine Directors, Ceinwen and Emma, the day kicked off with a panel discussion – think Oprah, but without the tears. Three young adults living with a cancer diagnosis, Robin, Chris and Jess, spoke eloquently about a range of subjects and took questions from the audience. Topics included dealing with uncertainty and anxiety; managing your own feelings and needs alongside the needs of your partner, parents and wider family and friends; dating after cancer; and returning to your career or readjusting career plans. Far from being depressing, their discussion was a lively, funny, raw and honest. Pretty much every person I spoke to could identify with something that was discussed on the panel and many people felt it was one of the best sessions of the day. (NB: You can view the Facebook Live video of the panel here). 

Having cancer as a young adult is a lonely business, and more than once someone at the conference mentioned the frequency with which we hear ‘oh, you’re very young for cancer!’ at clinic appointments. Having the opportunity to listen to and talk with others who are also ‘too young for cancer’ is like being hugged many understanding, warm arms. For me, this first session really set the tone for the rest of the day.

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Shine participants, Plus Ones and healthcare professionals came together

After the panel discussion, the conference attendees split into different sessions: building resilience, fertility after cancer, managing fatigue, and supporting children through an adult’s cancer. There was also a separate session for attendees who were the family/friends of a young adult with cancer, and a session about the needs of young adults with cancer for health care professionals. Over lunch (a super scrummy, healthy spread, followed by fruit or something a little more chocolaty if you preferred!) there was plenty of time to mingle and chat with others, and to swap tips gained from the various sessions. There was also a chance to talk to some of the other organisations that had stalls in the conference “market place”. These included Ellie’s Friends, a charity providing treats like days out and theatre tickets to young adults with cancer; the Lymphoma Association; Insurance With, a specialist travel insurance company for those with pre-existing medical conditions; and Maggie’s Centres. Look Good, Feel Better were there giving makeovers, while a couple of fabulous massage therapists set up downstairs and managed to give out 50 (!) free massages over the course of the day. Last, but definitely not least, Shine had invited Pets as Therapy to the conference, giving everyone who attended the chance to meet some very cute therapy dogs!

 

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One of the therapy dogs gets some love from a Connect participant!

The afternoon session saw some of the morning sessions repeated but there were also new sessions on sex, singing, and creativity in health. More than one person told me how difficult it had been to choose! Along with the majority of afternoon attendees, I went to the interactive sex session (that’s interactive as in talking about sex, in case you were wondering!) Led by the amazingly frank and funny Karen Hobbs and Dr Isabel White, a leading specialist in sexual problems related to cancer treatment, a range of issues were discussed, from physical limitations due to treatment, to chemically induced menopause. It was refreshing to focus on an area that is generally neglected by the medical profession.

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Dr. Isabel White and Karen Hobbs hosted a great (and funny!) sex after cancer session

The day was rounded off with a fascinating keynote speech from Professor Mark Petticrew, a global expert in public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who has carried out extensive research into psychological factors and whether they influence cancer and heart disease. During my own experience of cancer and recovery, the questions of how a ‘stressful’ life might have contributed to my diagnosis, and whether emotional stress might hinder recovery, were often brought up. Professor Petticrew’s research showed, however, that there is very little convincing evidence that stress causes cancer and that many of the studies on stress and cancer are seriously flawed. It was an interesting note to end on given that so many of us worry that we have done something to cause our cancer. There’s no need to get stressed out about this too!

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Prof Mark Petticrew from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

If you go to Shine’s website you’re able to listen to some fabulous podcasts of ‘Not Your Grandma’s Cancer Show’. Shine Connect could have been called ‘Not Your Grandma’s Cancer Conference’. It’s certainly unique in the cancer world. If you weren’t able to attend this year I strongly recommend you keep an eye out for Shine Connect 2018; who knows what fun will be added next year!

 

It definitely takes a village to make these events happen and we’d like to send massive thanks to TTA, the amazing events management company who helped us pull Shine Connect off for the second year in a row! Huge thanks also to Don’t Forget the Kids, Emily Hodge of Coaching Emily, Toby Peach and Tenovus Cancer Care for delivering some fabulous sessions at the conference! We’d also like to send a huge shout out to Look Good, Feel Better for running some great make-over sessions, and Keith and Rozalia from the Complementary Therapy Department at the Royal Free Hospital for giving free massages to our participants all day!

Breathe and bend! How yoga can help you cope with cancer

Every year, at Shine’s Great Escape, we run morning yoga sessions for our “Escapees”. For many, it’s the first time they’ve tried yoga and most people are pleasantly surprised by how much they get out of it.

In this blog, Stephanie Bartlett shares her experience of starting yoga during her cancer treatment and how it’s helped calm her busy mind.  Want to learn more? Below Stephanie’s blog, we’ve posted some ‘getting started’ tips from Shine’s yoga guru (and podcast host) Tatum de Roeck!


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Stephanie with son Theo

Last July I was diagnosed with cancer.  As a young and healthy 32 year old, I certainly wasn’t expecting it, though I have learnt very quickly it genuinely doesn’t matter who you are or how ‘healthy’ you thought you were.

Cancer for me has been ‘mind consuming’. In the seven months since my diagnosis, my mind has been consumed with everything cancer related, from the seemingly endless weeks of waiting for test results to the side effects of 18 weeks of chemotherapy to the apprehension of the next course of treatment; there was just no getting away from it.

That was until I discovered yoga. My very first yoga session consisted of some simple breathing techniques and some basic stretching and relaxation. I followed my instructor and it was very peaceful. I found it easy and I soon realised that an hour had passed and I hadn’t thought about cancer.

I can only describe how I felt after my first session as a balloon floating in the sea. I felt present in the here and now.  My mind felt completely empty.  No thoughts had entered my mind the entire time. I had no idea what it felt like to be free of the constant cancer woes until then. I also felt very relaxed, like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders and like I was finally lightened of the burden.

I continued to practice yoga with my instructor about once a fortnight and before I knew it I had learned a whole yoga flow and every session we were adding to it. I was also learning more how good it was for my mind and body. Post-surgery and during chemotherapy I looked forward to each session as I viewed it as my escape from cancer. I then found myself doing yoga on my own at home in the days in between seeing my instructor – I could finally escape cancer every day. I knew exactly what to do and I loved it.

The truly great thing about yoga is that no matter how I was feeling or how physically able I was (and this changed from week to week, with the effects of surgery or chemotherapy), I was always able to do yoga. And it’s really not about getting one leg wrapped around your neck while balancing in the shape of an elegant swan – rather, it’s all about connecting with yourself and using your mind and body no matter how much you’re able to move.  Basically, we can all do it, no matter how flexible you are.

As a busy and working mum to my five-year-old son, Theo, I’m constantly on the go.  Life is always eventful and there’s no escaping the constant need to be somewhere or do something.  This consumed a lot of my thoughts before cancer and adding cancer to that mix made life even crazier. Yoga enabled me not only to calm down my mind but also to focus on simply moving and breathing.  It lets me forget the chaos that life has thrown at me and it enables me to put into perspective the important things that are worthy of my attention. Most importantly, it also helps me forget about the pointless little things that can fill the gaps.

I have certainly caught the yoga bug; I now know a moon flow, what sun salutation is and can do my warrior poses.  During each of these yoga flows, the actions and breathing are the only things on my mind. Even before the cancer diagnosis I didn’t know it was possible to escape; I’ve always had a busy mind so for me it’s been a real eye opener. Steph1

I cannot recommend yoga enough to anyone going through a cancer diagnosis or treatment – an even those that aren’t. I once thought “oh, yoga is not for me – it’s too airy fairy”.  How wrong I was!  I have even booked myself onto a four day yoga retreat in Spain, as a reward once all my treatment is over. It’ll involve hours of yoga, relaxation and a well needed break in the sun.I genuinely never believed yoga would help me as much as it does but I honestly love what yoga does for me.  Give it a go, you won’t know until you try it!

Stephanie lives with her son, Theo, who is five, and she was one of Shine’s 2017 Escapees. To learn more about the Great Escape, click here. And if you’re interested in trying yoga, read on for a briefing by our yoga instructor (and podcast host) Tatum de Roeck!


Thinking of trying yoga after cancer?

Three months after Tatum de Roeck qualified as a yoga teacher, she was diagnosed with breast cancer.  Below, she shares her tips for getting started with yoga. Tatum

Even knowing quite a bit about yoga, I was still daunted going into a new class when my body felt so alien. It was tough dealing with feeling physically limited, emotionally all over map and mentally frazzled. What made it easier was having an idea what to expect from a class and how to find the right one.

I now teach yoga as my main job and give classes as part of Shine’s Great Escape weekend. Many Escapees have never done yoga before and the class has given them the chance to find out they rather like it! So for others who think they might fancy giving yoga a whirl here are some tips and thoughts to help make finding the first class a little easier.

Yoga is yoga, right?

Not all yoga is the same. The spectrum of classes range from ones where all the poses involve lying down on the ground with cushions and blocks, to hot sweaty powerful classes that seem to be created for acrobats from Cirque du Soliel.

I’m not flexible, can I still do yoga?

Yes! Yoga isn’t about what it looks like on the outside but how it feels inside your body. You can be one millimetre into a pose and feel the benefit of the stretch. If you feel it, that’s your pose and it is perfect. Someone else might have a different rotation in their hip joint and their legs may impressively flop out, but they may be working on how to engage their muscles instead which might be just as much of a challenge. It’s good to bear in mind since everyone’s body is wildly different (and always changing) we don’t bend to yoga, it is yoga that should bend to us.

Starting Slow

Slow classes give you time to try a pose, see if it’s right for you and adjust as needed. Even if it’s a super relaxing class it gives you a chance to hear some yoga terminology, become familiar with teachers providing different options, and to build confidence for trying the next class.

How do I find a slow class?

If there is a yoga studio nearby I would either pop in or give them a call to ask if they offer a relaxing, slow or gentle classes. Some bigger studios sometimes even offer classes handily named something like ‘yoga for people with cancer’. Most mid-size studios will have great introductory offers of unlimited classes for a couple of weeks. This can be a really useful (and far cheaper) way to try out different classes. Sometimes yoga classes at the gym are unhelpfully labelled ‘yoga’. In these cases its useful to get some more info otherwise you might be in a sweaty power hour territory.

The key things to ask is it is suitable for beginners and is it gentle? If possible it may be good to see if you can briefly contact the teacher before you plan to take the class.

A lot of cancer centres like Maggie’s also offer yoga and if they don’t offer yoga on the premises it’s worth giving them a call to see if they know a place or a teacher they’d recommend.

What do I wear?

The main thing is to wear something comfortable, which doesn’t restrict movement but isn’t too loose. The reason we don’t wear baggy T-shirts is because some of the poses (like a forward fold or child’s pose) will cause loose T-shirts to ride up exposing the stomach and lower back or rising so much it covers your face. Very baggy shorts can also show a bit more than you bargained for. If this happens you spend the class fighting with your clothes which takes away a little of the joy (I’m relaying this from personal experience!).

Getting to the first class early

It’s a good idea to get to your first class 15 minutes early. There will be forms to fill out and it’s a good time to talk to the teacher before the class starts. You can let them know you are trying yoga for the first time, that you may need to take it easy or have a part of your body where there is a limitation of movement. They are the best people to give you a bit of an idea about what to expect in the class.

Do I need to do all the poses?

Nope! Yoga is about being in the body and feeling out what is right for you. Anything that causes sharp pinching pain or any sensation which takes your breath away is a sign from your body saying that position isn’t right for you at that time. If this happens you can come out of the pose slightly or fully. There is a pose called child’s pose which is the go to position any time in the practice. It’s the pose to regain your breath, to rest or simply stay there until another pose that you might like comes along.

Giving it another go

Since there is such a variety in yoga styles, teacher personalities and range of environments it is worth giving yoga more than one class to really determine whether or not it’s right for you. If you find it ultimately isn’t what you want at the moment that’s totally ok too! You’ll know what it is and that it’s there if you ever want to come back to it.

Ask for Recommendations

One of the best ways to find a class is to ask others who have tried and tested classes already.  In the comments below, feel free to share your experiences and any places or teachers you love. You never know another Shiny person may be in your ‘hood and looking for a class!

 

It’s Lymphoma Awareness Month – Meet Ceinwen!

September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month so we thought this was a great time to share the story of one of our founding Directors, Ceinwen.

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Ceinwen (right) with Emma at Shine’s 2016 Great Escape

Diagnosed with Stage 4b diffuse large-b cell lymphoma in 2010, Ceinwen now runs Shine with Emma (look out for her profile soon for #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth) and heads up our fundraising activities, as well as designing our national programmes with Emma, our other Trustees and our amazing volunteers. Having been through cancer, its treatment and its aftermath, Ceinwen’s insight and experience is key to what we do at Shine and helps to ensure that all of our activities meet the needs of young adults with cancer. Read on and please share with others!

When were you diagnosed and what with?

I was diagnosed with Stage 4b diffuse large b-cell lymphoma in February 2010.

How did you find out you had cancer?

At the end of December 2009, I was pregnant. I became really unwell and had my daughter prematurely. The doctors thought that I was experiencing complications from the birth so I don’t think they took things too seriously at first. About three weeks later, I developed such excruciating back pain that I ended up calling an ambulance and going to the hospital. They gave me antibiotics but when I didn’t feel any better the next day, I went back. I then spent three and a half weeks in the hospital seeing all kinds of doctors who were trying to figure out what was wrong with me. Tuberculosis was looking like a good candidate for a while and I remember thinking “that doesn’t sound so bad” but after a chest x-ray they realised I had a large mass in my mediastinum (a part of the body I’d never heard of before!). They also discovered I had “lesions” on my liver – at the time, I also didn’t realise how bad that sounded. Eventually, someone got a haematologist to look at me and he put all the symptoms together. I’d had night sweats, fevers, loss of appetite and unbelievable fatigue – all typical symptoms – but no one had realised I had lymphoma.

What did you think and feel when you were diagnosed?

I had barely heard of lymphoma when I was told I had it. I knew nothing about cancer and was obviously worried I was going to die. I

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Ceinwen & her daughter today

was devastated and worried I wouldn’t get to see my daughter grow up. And then pretty quickly I went numb. I generally managed to hold it together during the day but spent a lot of nights panicking and crying. I was also told that I would have to stay in the hospital for six months receiving chemo and I remember wondering how my husband and I were going to manage work and a baby and cancer all at the same time.

How did the people around you react?

I think they were as shocked as I was by the diagnosis. I had never heard of anyone having cancer and a baby at the same time and neither had my friends or family. I remember thinking “Cancer and pregnancy is a thing?”. For the most part though, they rallied around. I had family and friends come to stay and look after my daughter and help my husband out. I was never short of visitors! If there’s one thing cancer taught me, it is how much I am loved. Whenever I have a bad day now I try to remember that.

What treatment did you have?

I was put on a clinical trial testing a high-dose chemotherapy regimen called R-CODOX-M/IVAC-R. I had a Hickman line and two of the rounds had 15 days of chemo followed by a recovery period, while the other two rounds were 7 days of chemo followed by a recovery period. Part of the treatment is having “IT chemo”. I remember seeing that on my treatment sheet and not knowing what it was. It turns out it is chemo injected into your spine. I was horrified! For me, that was the worst part of the treatment. I had to have it done 8 times and I’d already had a few lumbar punctures and a bone marrow biopsy by then, so by the time I finished treatment I never wanted anyone to go near my spine or back ever again!

How did you feel through treatment?

I know for a lot of people chemo makes them feel terrible, but I was so ill when I started that the treatment made me feel better. I’d been so weak that once the chemo kicked in and started to push back the cancer I felt totally different. I had a period of time where I went days without brushing my teeth or getting out of bed. To be able to get up and take a shower felt like a miracle.

What happened after treatment finished?

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Monthly immunoglobulin infusion done at the hospital

For about a year after treatment, I focused on getting my fitness back. Spending six months in bed is terrible for you and I found it hard to walk for long periods because my feet and back ached. Just as I was getting back into running, I caught meningitis. I ended up back in the hospital for a month and it was then that the doctors discovered that my immune system had really taken a hit as a result of one of the drugs I’d had. My body basically doesn’t produce b-cells properly anymore so I need monthly immunoglobulin replacement therapy to prevent me from getting any more infections. Immunoglobulins are super expensive so I like to think of myself as a million dollar woman.

Tell us about your work with Shine

Shine is my and Emma’s baby! Both of us were diagnosed with cancer as young adults and we both found there was a real lack of support out there. If you aren’t a child or teenager, you get lumped in with elderly patients who may be lovely, but they don’t get what you’re going through. I remember mentioning to some people that I volunteered with how I was missing loads of work because my appointments took all day and they said “Oh, I just pack a lunch and make a day of it”. We had very different perspectives!

I met Emma at the end of 2010 and found out she had started a support group in Dorset called Shine. I’d wanted to do the same thing in London so we decided to work together. Since then, we’ve grown Shine into something bigger than we ever imagined six years ago. Our first workshop in April 2012 had about 20 people at it. Last year, our Shine Connect conference had 100. It’s been amazing to see how many people we’ve been able to reach and support. I always thought that I wouldn’t want anyone else to feel as alone as I did when I was diagnosed. I hope with Shine we’re helping to make that happen.

What difference has Shine made to you?

Apart from loving my job, Shine has also given me friends and support that I didn’t have back in 2010. I still get regular check ups, and aches and pains still freak me out. It’s good to have people I can call up to share my worries with – people who totally get it because they’ve been there. I frequently diagnose myself with other forms of cancer – cancer of the toe, cancer of the eyebrow, etc. etc. – and it’s really good to have friends who understand exactly why I’d be concerned that the bruise on my foot is cancer (and to explain why it’s probably not)

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Ceinwen with some of Shine’s peer supporters at the 2016 Great Escape

How do you feel now about your experiences? What‘s been the biggest change you’ve faced?

I think it can be hard to feel positive about something so awful, particularly something that changes your life so fundamentally. All of the things I thought I would have in terms of family and career changed when I was diagnosed. I was working in international development when I got sick and I remember my doctor saying that the sort of travel I used to do wasn’t an option, at least in the short term.

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Ceinwen working in Kathmandu, Nepal while pregnant – shortly before getting ill.

You can’t ever go back to who you were before, as much as you might like to. Some days, that really sucks. Having said that, I’m in a good place now! I absolutely love all the work we do at Shine and have a lot of fun. I’ve laughed more in the last six years than I did in the six years before that. Having a few life threatening illnesses does give you a different perspective on things!

If you could give one piece of advice to yourself before your diagnosis what would it be?

I remember being really annoyed that I’d managed to get so ill because I thought I was taking care of myself – I was a vegetarian and exercised a lot. Obviously I got sick anyway, so I’d probably tell myself to eat more cake.

You can read more personal profiles from Shine’s community here. Shine also has an private online community that we run via Facebook. To join, send us a request and then send a message to us through our main Facebook page. 

Bowel cancer and talking sh*t!

“So, you’re fine now, right?”

Ah, the question that often gets asked when you tell people your cancer woes! And the thing is, it’s usually asked with the best of intentions. Your friends and acquaintances want you to be fine – but ‘fine’ can mean very different things once your body has been through cancer treatment.

In our latest blog, we are literally talking sh*t!  Our writer, Pippa, shares her experiences of a bowel cancer diagnosis and treatment in her early 30s and explains what the ‘new normal’ can feel like once your insides have been through the wringer. Having trouble explaining to people what your life is like now? Please feel free to share with others and, as always, let us know what you think.


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Pippa, during treatment

We live in a country where people are embarrassed to talk about their bodily functions, particularly their bowel movements. We rarely talk about them with our friends and family (you know you have a close friend if you do!) and we especially don’t like to talk about them with strangers, even doctors. This inability to talk about bowel movements is undoubtedly putting lives at risk and it almost cost me my life.

Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in both women and men in the UK, and the second most common cause of cancer death in the UK, after lung cancer. Like many cancers, bowel cancer is more common in older people and screening is offered for those who are 60 or older. However, there are quite a few of us who are considerably younger who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer. As screening is only available to those who are older (and even then, it isn’t 100% reliable) you need to be aware of the symptoms of bowel cancer and talk to someone, like your GP, if you are experiencing them.

Before I was diagnosed, I experienced both a change in bowel habits and blood in my stools. These symptoms coincided with starting a new job and I put them down to stress. I was also embarrassed and didn’t want to talk to my doctor about it. I finally went to my GP fifteen months later. What finally convinced me to go? Confiding in my mum and one of my sisters. They were adamant I went to the doctor and it was actually much easier than I thought it would be to speak to my GP about poo! She referred me immediately for a colonoscopy, which is how my bowel cancer was discovered.

When you’re diagnosed with bowel cancer your life will forever revolve around poo, a subject that no-one wants to discuss! During treatment your bowels take a battering and a lot of people have a stoma (temporary or permanent) which brings its own poo challenges. I never imagined my life would involve waking up in the middle of the night and feeling a warm liquid all over my abdomen -and that liquid turning out to be poo from a stoma bag leak. Equally memorable was the occasion, soon after my operation, when I didn’t have a firm enough grip on my stoma bag as I was trying to empty it. Instead of emptying a very liquid poo into the toilet, it went all over the seat, my clothes and the floor – in fact, it went everywhere other than the toilet bowl. Happy times!

Being diagnosed with bowel cancer means you very quickly have to get over any qualms you might have had about talking about poo. Not only do you get used to crowds of people looking at or up your backside, but every appointment with consultants involves discussing your bowel movements.

Even once treatment is over, people rarely return to “normal” bowel function. The consultants like to refer to the period post-treatment as “getting used to your new normal”. For a lot of people, the final part of their treatment is having a temporary stoma reversed, which is when the bowel is reconnected for the first time post-treatment. A section of bowel will have been removed and the bowel that remains will have been affected by other treatments like chemo and radiotherapy. As a result, the speed at which poo moves through your bowel, as well as your bowel’s reaction to food and environmental stresses, will have changed. It is not uncommon post-surgery to spend a considerable amount of time on the toilet. Not only do you poo a lot, but it can also take a considerable time to fully empty your bowels. Challenges include feeling like you need to do a poo but not being able to, going to the loo, cleaning yourself up and then immediately needing to go again (referred to as clustering). No one understands the pure joy of passing a single normal poo until you have had bowel cancer!

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A post-treatment Pippa

These challenges are all a pain when you’re at home but they present even greater challenges when you’re out of the house. Prior to being diagnosed with cancer I tried to never do a poo outside of my own bathroom at home. Post-cancer, that is impossible. In the early stages post-treatment I didn’t like to be far from a toilet because if I needed to go, I had a very short period of time in which I could hold onto my bowel. Please don’t judge if you see a person who looks “perfectly normal” rushing into a disabled toilet. There are a number of medical conditions that mean that people need urgent access to a toilet and until you have experienced incontinence you can’t fully understand how embarrassing and horrible that is. If all other toilets are busy, the disabled toilets can be your only option to avoid an accident. Disabled toilets also provide more space to move around. When you have a stoma, you need that additional room to be able to empty your bag or to replace the bag if you’re unlucky enough to have a bag leak while you are out and about.

It can be very isolating to deal with the after effects of bowel cancer and the treatments. Thanks to Shine I have met a number of fellow “Bowelies” with whom I can have frank chats about poo and all of the other shit that comes with bowel cancer!

I am really passionate about educating people about the symptoms of bowel cancer and getting them talking about their bowel habits more. People can literally die from embarrassment and that’s not right.

Pippa Woodward-Smith is 34 and lives in Southampton. You can meet others like Pippa at our upcoming Shine Connect conference on 23rd April in London.

 

 

10 ways to help a friend coping with cancer

We often post articles on Twitter and Facebook about what to say to a friend or family member who has cancer, or how you might help them. We’ve also noticed that these often get a huge number of hits! That got us wondering how the members of our growing Shine community have been helped by family and friends when they’ve been ill – so we asked them! We got some great responses and we’ve summarised them below. Have a friend in need? Take a look below and see if we can inspire you!


Message1. Let them know you’re thinking of them

“One of my friends sent me a card every week that I was in the hospital – and I was in there for a long time.  It was so nice to receive a surprise in the mail and to hear all her news.  I’m not sure she knows how much it meant to me but I’ve kept all the cards as a reminder of what a great friend she is”.

When you’re ill, sometimes just knowing that you’re still part of the land of the living is all you need. A text, a card, a phone call – no matter how brief – can make a huge difference to someone who hasn’t been out and about much, especially if you’re clear that you don’t expect a reply.  Being ill can be very lonely so knowing that your friends and family are still thinking of you can make a huge difference.

2. Cook

“A friend bought 12 homemade freezer meals at two separate points during chemo. Even though I didn’t feel like eating most of the time at least I knew there was something quick, easy and on hand for my husband and daughter. I was very touched at her kindness and effort”.

If you’re a whizz icookn the kitchen, there’s nothing quite like a homemade meal to perk up someone who isn’t feeling great. And even if they don’t feel like eating because treatment has done a number on their appetite, you might be easing their stress by making sure other members of their family have something quick and easy to eat when the hunger pangs hit.

3. Clean

cleaningNot big on cooking? How about cleaning? A lot of our Shine members mentioned that they’d had friends who had popped in to clean the bathroom and kitchen, or put fresh sheets on the bed (and do the laundry) while they flaked out in front of the tv.  There’s nothing quite like clean sheets and a nice fresh towel – and it doesn’t take very long either!

4. Hang out

“For me, I was happy just to have people to keep me company. I think as a young lad people don’t know what to say and some people found it easier to avoid me.  I was happiest when people just came round and played computer games or chatted, especially when I couldn’t do much else beyond letting them in!”

super-1138462_1920Your mate may not be up for a heavy night down the pub, but heading over to his or hers with a movie, a computer game or even a pack of cards can really boost someone’s spirits. Something that doesn’t require a lot of mental or physical energy – like hanging on the sofa – but keeps them involved in the world around them is often really appreciated.

 

 

5. Get them out and about

“I went to Glastonbury festival after my treatment and all my friends had to take it in turn to carry all my belongings and helping me hobble around. I felt guilty about ruining their fun, but in reality I genuinely felt they were happy to have me there.  This reassurance was enough for me.”

We get it – being around really sick people can be scary. But helping a friend by taking them out, even if they’re going to need extra support, can help them feel like they’re still participating in all the things that they should be doing.  Keep in mind that they might not be able to walk long distances or stay out late, but if you can pick them up and drive them to a restaurant, or help them carry their stuff without making them feel bad, you’re more than half way to making their day!

6. Entertain the kids

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Let’s face it, kids can be exhausting at the best of times. If your friend has little ones, why not take them out for an afternoon or come over and cook them dinner while your friend has a nap? If they’re old enough, an afternoon movie or a trip to the park could give your friend a much needed break.  Or invite your friend and the kids over. You entertain them while your friend chills out with a cup of tea!

7. Head to the hospital

Something that everyone with cancer knows is that it’s time consuming – and hospital appointments can take ages.  If your friend is spending more time with the nurses and doctors than his/her mates, why not offer to keep them company? Ask if they’d like someone to take them to the hospital, pick them up, or hang out in between.  Having someone to gossip to can be a great distraction from the blood tests, scans and doctor chats.

8. Walk their dog

12376834_10156672952605263_2785600398398241687_nDoes your friend have a pooch? Why not ask if you can help walk the dog a few times a week? If your friend is happy for you to do it, see if you can get a few other friends together and organise a walking roster. On a good day, your friend might just want company for the walk. On a bad day they’ll be glad to have someone do the walking (and poo scooping!).

9. Organise a treat

“One of the most helpful things was planning something nice for my husband and I to do or go for a treat on the week before my next chemo. These did not cost much or sometimes nothing at all but it was something to focus on in the rotten days”.

“My friends always organised a get together on “chemo eve”, which was lovely.”

Cancer can be expensive! Not only are you missing work, but you’re spending your money heading to and from the hospital, on parking charges, and on extra blankets and heating to keep you warm. If you’re looking for a simple way to cheer someone up, why not plan a night out to the cinema or a comedy show? Book tickets when you know they’re free and either take them yourself or organise for others to go with them. (One minor note of caution: if you can, check if there’s cancer in the movie at all. You’d be surprised how many people in movies die of cancer. It’s not what you need when you’re going through treatment!).

10. Help them celebrate

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Having the energy for Christmas, Easter or a birthday can be tough when you’re coping with a cancer diagnosis.  Does your friend need help buying a tree or getting the decorations out? It can be hard for people to know what they need but asking specifically how their planning for a holiday is coming can open up whole new possibilities for help! Buy the Easter eggs, plan the hunt, decorate the tree, light the candles, buy the cake….the options are practically endless.

Got more ideas? What have we missed? Let us know! Comment below or Tweet us @shinecancersupp

 

 

Life, but not as you knew it: Being a “Plus One”

Most of the blogs we feature are written by young adults who are living with cancer – but who cares for those who care for us? And what does it feel like? In our latest blog, Caroline writes about coping with her husband’s diagnosis and the ways she found to look after herself when everyone was relying on her. Shine has a small but growing “Plus Ones’ network. If you’re a partner, friend, parent or sibling of a young adult with cancer, why not join our growing Shine Plus Ones network? We run it via Facebook – just click on the link and request to join.

As always, we’d love to know what you think about this blog – and please share it with anyone you know who might be interested!


Cancer barged into our lives uninvited, ruthless and arrogant, and rapidly took the reins. Even before my husband was diagnosed, we knew something wasn’t right and our lives had already changed significantly – mostly in terms of anxiety. I would lay awake in the still of the night, hugging my nursing daughter close, terrified that I might soon be a single mum. Our life full of promise – in a new home, a new job, new friends and a new baby – was stopped in its tracks. The foundations of my life were suddenly very unstable and a new role as “carer” had been thrust upon me.

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Blogger Caroline Puschendorf

Cancer became our dictator

From the day we received the diagnosis – germ cell carcinoma, intermediate stage – the loss of control of our daily lives seemed to escalate. My life was no longer about running the home, toddler groups, changing nappies and days out as a family. It became about appointments, test results, clinics and chemo. As much as I tried to keep things “normal” for the kids, the inability to plan was overwhelming. Even mundane decisions that I previously took for granted were no longer within my control. I didn’t know from one day to the next where our family would need to be or who would look after the kids and for how long. The unpredictability of my husband’s symptoms challenged family life even on the days that weren’t disrupted by unscheduled or delayed hospital appointments.

Then, just as we were settled into a rhythm with chemo and had a “treat to cure” plan, my husband got very ill with a virus while he was neutropenic. We were back on high alert. This was a stark reminder of the fragility of our situation, the uncertainty of the future and my perceived powerlessness.

I was exhausted, emotionally drained, and my own health was beginning to unravel

Caught up in the adrenalin and anxiety of my husband’s health crisis, I neglected my own health, both physical and emotional, by repeatedly prioritising my family. I slowly realised that my health was just as important – after all, everyone was relying on me, plus it was one thing I could control. I chose to invest in myself and to proactively nourish and nurture my family. I researched and developed a “no-fad” cancer-patient friendly eating plan and set about caring for my family’s health.

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Caroline’s husband, Rob, and one of their children

As a biologist I am well aware that our bodies need a plethora of resources to function at their best. We need nourishment, rest and movement in unique and varying amounts, especially in sickness. Only when balance is achieved do we build the reserves we need to invest into others and/or support our body in recovering from illness.

Having been a carer with two young kids, I know how important my health is, but also how easy it is to put it at the bottom of the list, but once I adopted some simple strategies, my emotional and physical health – and that of my family -massively improved.

Staying in the moment

  1. Being still for 5 minutes each day. Simply breathe and be there. Accept all thoughts and feelings that come, embrace and experience them,–especially the hard, gut-wrenching ones, then release them. This is difficult, as we get so used to suppressing emotions and putting on a brave face, but this strategy stopped me misdirecting my anger, anxiety and frustration at unsuspecting and innocent parties. For example, I realised that when my son’s behaviour was uncharacteristically awful, it was actually a reflection of my anxiety, fear or stress. Acknowledging these emotions allowed us to enjoy each other and have fun.
  2. Connecting with my husband. It’s easy to slip into the role of carer and loose touch with your old relationship. Make time to love each other in the way that you used to; a partner, sister, brother, son or daughter. Love without pity, sympathy, anger or fear. Just be there with love and laughter. Remind yourselves of what you mean to one another.
  3. Being grateful every day. I used to get annoyed when people said this to me, were they expecting me to be grateful we had cancer? That’s not what I am saying. I am saying find the positives, even the little ones, each day. Is the sun shining? Did you find a parking space? Did you get good results? Were you able to share time together? Getting into the habit of thinking through the positives, event while you brush your teeth, can be a powerful thing!

Taking control of my health

In addition to the above, I also made a few changes to my diet and routine:

  1. I took Epsom salt baths 1-2 times a week. This was amazing for alleviating tension and encouraging a peaceful sleep – something that was very elusive!
  2. I cut back on caffeine and sugar. These are easy to over-dose on, especially during times of stress, but they ended up making me feel irritable and tired, which was less than ideal. I also stayed away from hospital vending machines and made sure to take healthy snacks – like fruit and raw nuts – to our appointments.
  3. I implemented a “no-fad” cancer-patient friendly diet. Taking charge of family health through food was really empowering. I found a way of eating that suited the whole family and was based largely around a mineral broth.  It was easy to eat and highly nutritious food that worked well for a chemo-weary tummy!

After three rounds of BEP chemo and major abdominal surgery, my husband is now in remission. Life is slowly returning to a new kind of normal, and that’s ok.  Cancer slowed us down and changed us, but it hasn’t broken us. There’s a lot of life to live and we are bouncing back!

Caroline Puschendorf is a nutrition and health coach who blogs regularly here.  For some of her recipes, including her Super Mineral Broth, look here.

 

 

A Shiny, Cloudy Escape

The Great Escape is Shine’s flagship weekend for young adults with cancer. Every January we gather 22 people at the Grove Hotel in Bournemouth for a weekend of hanging out, information, walks – and usually some karaoke.  This year’s Escape (our third!) was just as fabulous as our earlier two and we’re grateful to Robin Taylor who has written a blog about his experiences at the event. We’ll open registration for our 2017 Escape in October but you can learn more about it on our website, including videos from our previous weekends.


 

A Shiny Cloudy Escape

Photo - Robin Taylor

Our blogger and 2016 Escapee, Robin

Just before Christmas 2014, I was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma, a form of blood cancer mostly seen in children and adolescents. I am 34 and was previously pretty healthy. I have since been through a rollercoaster ride of treatment and recovery and 12 months on I’m finally settling back into a routine. I joined Shine Cancer Support to meet people of my own age who have been through similar experiences and decided to apply for the Great Escape because it seemed like a great opportunity to network and meet others outside my usual social group.

The ‘Journey’

I arrived at the Grove Hotel just before the Escape officially started. I’m naturally a little shy and it usually takes me a few moments to adjust to a new group. A group of people were leaving to get lunch and it suddenly dawned on me that, as I hadn’t been to a Shine event before, I might be the only person to not know anyone. However, I was greeted with a friendly smile by Laura, who signed me in and pointed me in the direction of my room. I dropped off my bags and decided to find the lay of the land. As I walked down the corridor, I met another “Escapee” who said that she didn’t know anyone either so we decided to find coffee.

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Robin during treatment

I soon realised that most people had met for the first time that day and that I was less of an outsider than I had first thought. As we sat down for coffee, we were handed bags with name badges and some notepads, leaflets and goodies including chocolate. There were now a few of us sat chatting in the warm conservatory looking out onto the garden. A few minutes in, Emma bounced into the room and introduced herself, welcoming each with a hug. I think she spotted my British awkwardness and apologised saying “sorry, but that’s how I roll; you’ll get used to me,” I had been in the building for about fifteen minutes and already felt like part of the team. Emma was followed by Ceinwen who identified with me as a “chemo buddy” as we’d had the same treatment.

Breaking Ice

After coffee, we headed to the main meeting room. Emma and Ceinwen (whom Emma helpfully introduced as ‘Kine-When’) quickly built a great rapport and the presentation was informal and engaging. They talked through the schedule, some ground rules and explained that the weekend might be emotional. We were also introduced to the support staff including a (very much in demand) psychologist and an on call nurse. In talking to the ‘peer supporters’ (young adults who have had cancer and have been on previous Escapes) throughout the weekend, it was clear that they were all easy to talk to and had a wealth of knowledge to offer. The activities for the first day were designed to help us get to know each other. At dinner-time, the tables were chosen for us at random which worked really well as we all quickly met and, by the end of the second day, everyone knew each other.

I surprised myself at how quickly I had settled in – within 24 hours, strangers had become friends. By the end of the day inappropriate jokes and cancer-related anecdotes capped a raucous evening

Day 2 – Calm before the storm

Yoga (which was optional), a first for me, kick started my morning. As a runner, I could see the value of the stretches and the relaxation techniques. The session was designed to cater for all abilities and I could feel the benefit at breakfast.

The day started with a myth-busting discussion – it was interesting to see that I was not alone in my ‘common knowledge’ and ‘tabloid fact’ scepticism. We were introduced to some useful online resources with which we could help inform our opinions.

The afternoon was a fairly intense discussion about the emotional strain that a diagnosis can have on us. There were some really emotive discussions around how we managed our personal feelings and those around us who were also affected. Listening to some of the conversations found me holding back tears on a number of occasions.

We went out for dinner which was held at a fine high street pizza establishment – a welcome break from the walls of the hotel and good to catch up with people in a neutral environment.

Day 3 – A Sea Change

After my second yoga experience, we quickly settled into a discussion around relationships. We talked about how we communicated with friends, family and partners. On top of our varying diagnoses and prognoses, our family lives were just as varied but sharing the host of struggles that we could all identify with was a liberating experience.

The lads in the group were in the minority, but I had a number of really engaging, open and frank conversations. It seems that we all had handled ourselves in a very similar way and talking through our coping strategies was both cathartic and enlightening.

After lunch we broke into separate groups, and I was glad to see that I was not the only bloke in the fertility discussion. Though outnumbered, I felt comfortable talking about this difficult subject in front of the group, and the discussion was well guided by a highly experienced specialist nurse. As one of my fellow male companions said later “we learned a lot about how… er it works” (followed by a huge laugh from the group)

Apart from a few optional activities, there was a fairly generous break before dinner so I decided to go and hide. I didn’t even get round to switching the TV on or pick up my book as planned before the emotions started pouring out of me. To help me get through the next few hours, I decided to write a poem:

A bottle

There’s a bottle within which all my tears go.
Emotion comes, I take one, stopper the jar, then stem the flow. 

It’s difficult to know where and when or why they come.
The swelling fear, the hide and run.

Feelings don’t frighten me, I know they’re there.
I’ve just learned to close them down.
I don’t reflect, I look forward.
I don’t regret, I learn.
I’m trying to live,
to work,
to achieve.

My experiences don’t define me.
I learn from my experiences and define myself around them.
I’m still learning.

I’m trying to live,
to work,
to love.

I’m realizing…
that soon,
if I don’t let them out,
the bottle might explode.

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Karaoke superstars

Before I knew it, it was time to head back for dinner which was followed by a pretty intense evening of karaoke. Audience participation was at a record breaking high, and some unexpected superstars arose from behind the curtain.

Hike and home

The event of the final day was the ‘Hengistbury Hike.’ We started with a talk from a fitness instructor whose specialism is working with cancer patients. As with all the speakers and contributors of the weekend, he was engaging and interesting – and even for a fitness convert like me, his approach was really interesting. The hike was well planned with different routes depending on ability and we spent most of the time chatting and taking in the beautiful scenery. The weather was exactly as expected (rainy and cold!), but refreshing and not too harsh on us. We returned for a de-briefing followed by a hugely emotional and huggy parting of our ways.

Group walk

2016 Escapees starting the Hengistbury Hike

The journey home was a blur – I had the radio on but didn’t hear it. I think my mind was spinning from all I had learned and the wonderful people I had met. The comments in our private online group over the following days have been a testament to the bonds we formed, and I’m very grateful to everyone for having shared part of themselves with me.

I would have no hesitation in recommending the Escape to other people. On top of a range of practical advice, I learned that talking about how I feel is not only important for my own recovery, it will help those around me.

Robin Taylor blogs at http://www.robinbtaylor.com