Shine takes cancer support to Yorkshire!

Linz was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer and the BRCA1 gene just after turning 38, and she’s passionate about bringing people together to help deal with cancer. In this post, she writes about her first Shine event: a weekend away with Shine North East in the Yorkshire Dales.


The weekend was full of promise: I was coming to this event as a newbie, all the way from Edinburgh to gate-crash a weekend of ‘folk like me’. The setting was a lovely holiday home called Springwood Cottage near Huddersfield, and the background music was the soundtrack from ‘The Greatest Showman’. The idea was simply for a group of young adults with cancer to share a cottage for the weekend: no plans, no itinerary, no rules, and no barriers.  All just pitch up, pitch in, and enjoy ourselves.

I had come across Shine Cancer Support only a few months previously, just by doing a search on Facebook.  I am a member of various cancer support groups on Facebook and Twitter, but aside from a lovely lunch ‘tweet up’ in Manchester a few months back, I had not actually engaged much with other people going through cancer treatment. There certainly isn’t much for us ‘in-betweeners’ aged 20-50. Talking to people online is great but meeting up in person is so much better! In total there were going to be 17 of us on this weekend – all walks of life, all different types of cancer and associated treatments.  All in all, a lovely bunch of people who are much more than the ‘cancer tag’!

After getting there, two of us went for coffee and cake as we waited to pick up some of the group from the train station five minutes away.  Finding the train station was easy but finding my way back to the cottage each time meant a little detour… oops!

Friday evening was a relaxed affair, introducing ourselves and getting ourselves set up in the rooms.  The location itself was amazing as we had our own hot tub, as well as a rooftop patio!  For some, the thought of sharing rooms with strangers was possibly a little odd at first, but actually it all turned out grand. Dinner was spectacular, and after a few drinks of own choosing we all attempted the icebreaker of making ourselves a cardboard crown with various craft materials.  Some people are exceptionally talented in this area. I am clearly not!

It was really interesting to talk to people about what cancer they have/had, and the treatment plans and side effects/consequences of treatment they experienced.  It was also good to hear about their personal lives, both pre- and post-diagnosis.  To be quite frank, I am at that stage where I question everything about my life, who I am, and what I want to do now. For a little while I had become quite insular and cancer was all I could focus on.  But even more important for me over this weekend was actually to see and hear how other people live their lives post-diagnosis and treatment, in terms of families, holidays, adventures, and work.  dsc_0584.jpg

Given that this was very much a weekend where everyone pitched in and helped, it was almost like an episode of ‘Big Brother’ without the cameras…! In a non-threatening, non-competitive way, of course!

Saturday was relaxing, too. First off, two of the women produced a spectacular cooked breakfast. I honestly don’t think I have eaten so well anywhere!

Afterwards, a beauty therapist visited to offer sessions ranging from facials and massages, through to reflexology, for those who were interested.  Some of us decided to take a few cars over to the nearby town of Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, which is where ‘Last of the Summer Wine’ was filmed.  There was actually a folk festival on that day, and it was great to soak up the atmosphere and find a wee secluded beer garden, then search for ice cream. Other people in the group opted to walk around and soak up the wonderful weather that we had that weekend too.

Later that night, after another amazing dinner, most of us sat down to watch Eurovision and play some games.  Many of us also took the opportunity to jump into the hot tub and let any lingering strains and tensions melt away…

Sunday morning saw another spectacular cooked breakfast before some of us took a gentle meandering walk up the road.  A Sunday roast completed the weekend for me, before I headed home into the sunset…

Overall, it was a great weekend, and I feel that I have made some new friends that actually get everything I have experienced and inspire me to get through the post-treatment slump. It was also not all about the cancer! We laughed and joked, and I even managed to use some of my professional skills to help others, too.

If you’re ever thinking about coming to an event like this one, then I would definitely recommend it!

I’d like to say a HUGE thank you to Shine North East network leader Rachel, who organised the whole weekend.  She’s a special and wonderful person who is spectacular and lovely and kind. Thank you for letting me come!  I know how much effort it takes to organise an event like this, and that makes both Rachel and Shine very special indeed.

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Great Escape: reunited!

2018 Escapee Caroline shares her experience of our Great Escape Reunion, a one-off event celebrating five years of weekend retreats for young people with cancer.


I was lucky enough to be able to attend the 2018 Shine Great Escape (read my fellow Escapee Rosie’s blog about it here), and I was invited to the Great Escape Reunion almost as soon as I had accepted my place on the Escape itself!

It turns out that 2018 was a year worthy of celebration: the Great Escape that I attended was the fifth weekend away for young adults with cancer that Ceinwen Giles and Emma Willis had organised since Shine began. In March, Shine organised a reunion event in London, inviting all of those who had attended a Great Escape to come along and celebrate the anniversary with them.

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Some of the 2018 Great Escape attendees reunited!

The afternoon began with tea, cake, and conversation, which gave us time to chat with our fellow Escapees and meet those who had attended in previous years. While it was a great opportunity for many to catch up, for the 2018 attendees it was also a chance to get to know each other better. Although we all feel a strong bond with our ‘tribe’ as a result of the Escape, there are still so many things that we want to learn!

Once we’d warmed up and helped ourselves to a piece of flapjack or four, the Reunion continued in true Escape style – with Sharpies, crafts, and collages. Although some Escapees remain defiantly unartistic, everyone took part in creating collages to show how the experience had affected their lives. It was amazing to see how much one weekend away could change our perceptions about cancer and our attitudes towards living with the disease.

After the activities came a potted history of the Shine and the Escape from Ceinwen and Emma, including stories about how they’d manage to convince friends and friends of friends to sign up to voluntarily spend a weekend at a hotel in Bournemouth with a group of young people with cancer – hardly the most glamorous of mini-break ideas! We are all overwhelming grateful that they pulled it off, as the next portion of the afternoon showed. Representatives from each Great Escape gave short presentations about their experiences and gave us an insight into what everyone had been doing since their Escape. This part of the afternoon was emotional for many reasons. It was fantastic to see photos of weddings, exciting trips abroad, and new babies, which gave us optimism for our futures beyond cancer. However, the moving tributes to those who have sadly passed away since attending their Escape reminded us all about what it is that brings us together. After the presentations, we raised a glass not only to Ceinwen, Emma, and the volunteers, but also to the wonderful Escapees who are no longer with us.

And as for the 2018 Escapees? Although we weren’t convinced that we would have much to report after only a few weeks apart, we had managed to achieve a surprising amount: a few new jobs, several dates, a couple of people returning to work, and some meet-ups already in the calendar for later in the year. And then, of course, the few thousand (!) WhatsApp messages we had exchanged with each other since leaving Bournemouth. It seems that a Shine Great Escape isn’t a Shine Great Escape without a very active WhatsApp or Facebook group!

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Fond memories of the Escape…

The reunion came to a close with a group discussion about the future of Shine, and how we could ensure that more young people are able to benefit from everything the charity has to offer, then a delicious buffet.

 

I’ll leave you with a few comments about the day from my fellow 2018 Escapees. Thank you again for everything Shine, and all the volunteers who have contributed to the Great Escape!

‘It was great to chat to previous attendees and see that they are still benefiting from the Escape and have gone on to make good progress. Also, it was nice to see that they are still good friends with each other years later. The Escape has a long-lasting impact and doesn’t just fizzle out after leaving the bubble of The Grove.’

‘I get really tearful thinking about our Escape and the Reunion. I feel like I belong with you guys, where I don’t belong anywhere else.’

‘[Our group photo from the Reunion is] my work screensaver!! I look really happy, which makes me smile, and when I have a tough day it reminds me that we’re in this together.’

What is a ‘Great Escape’? To learn more about the Shine Great Escape and how you could apply to take part, check out our website here

Life – but not as you knew it: Laughter as medicine!

Got a case of the January blahs? Here at Shine, we’ve been looking at ways that we can beat the dark, grey days and bring a bit of happiness into our lives, regardless of the challenges 2015 might bring.  Luckily for us, we found Mandy Riches of Grin and Tonic which uses Laughtercise (yes, you read that correctly!) to promote physical and psychological health.  Mandy understands cancer because she’s been there: diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma twice in her twenties, she was then diagnosed in 2011/2012 with breast cancer.  Yes, we know it sounds a bit weird but we also think it sounds like lots of fun so read on and visit her website for more information!


Mandy Riches

Three-time cancer superhero and laughtercise guru Mandy Riches

 

There’s something about one year ending and a new year beginning that I find unsettling. It’s often a time for self-reflection which brings a myriad of emotions, ranging from the optimism and excitement of new opportunities, to a longing to simply curl up under the duvet and hide from the world. Since I was first diagnosed with cancer over 20 years ago, I’ve often had an urgency to really ‘live’ life though I’ve found that this is a double-edged sword.

On the one hand, it contributes to the fact that I can look back on 2014 and feel incredibly proud at achieving what I describe as my crazy scary challenge: cycling from Edinburgh to London in five days for charity. For someone who often feels like a cancer factory, this accomplishment helped me to regain strength both mentally and physically. The absolute focus on following my heart and in achieving something that once seemed out of reach was invigorating.

The flip side is that this urgency sometimes completely and utterly overwhelms me – the need to make the new year count, the need to make every month, every week, every day, every second count. It can be exhausting and my New Year self-reflections could easily spiral into the January blues. However, as I lie snuggled up nursing my inevitable winter cold, I have decided instead that I will laugh in the face of the January blues using Laughtercise.

What is Laughtercise I hear you ask?

Laughtercise is based on the principles of laughter yoga, which combines laughter with deep breathing. When my good friend Stephanie Hill from Grin and Tonic heard about my third diagnosis of cancer, she felt powerless and wanted to find some way to help me and my family, so she engaged us in using laughter as an exercise (as opposed to laughing at comedy or jokes). With simple, fun exercises and some deep breathing your serotonin (the happy hormone) increases, the laughter becomes contagious. You feel more relaxed, less stressed, more energised. Like many, I found it a bit barmy at first and I could have easily discarded it as “I’m way too reserved for that kind of thing”. But by simply letting go a little and using techniques to anchor it into daily life, it was brilliant.

Mandy and her colleague, Steph

Mandy and her colleague, Steph

For most of my adult life, I’ve been dancing the tango with cancer: twice with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the 1990s and then breast cancer in 2011/12. I was devastated to have cancer for a third time, and it hit me much harder emotionally. I don’t know if it was the optimism of youth that carried me through the first two, or the cumulative effect of ‘here we go again’. Perhaps there was even an element of the unfairness of the breast cancer being caused by the radiotherapy I received for the Hodgkin’s.

One way or another, I experienced an overwhelming sense of emotion. I found myself crying for no real reason, I couldn’t sleep and I’d often wake up with tears streaming down my face. I found it really difficult to articulate what was going on.  Mortality had smacked me in face again and at least some part of me felt smashed, whether that was my sense of myself and who I was, my loss of innocence, my view on time, my view on what next.

I never thought that Laughtercise would become such a useful tool, but it did, and continues to be so. It has helped me to feel more in control of my life at a point when it seemed like cancer had taken over everything and every thought. Physically, the act of laughing and the deep breathing also helped to release some of the tightness I felt in my chest following reconstruction for my bi-lateral mastectomy. It also helped me connect with my family and friends in a really meaningful way.  When you’re dealing with cancer, people don’t know if they are allowed to laugh around you.  It was easy for me to give ‘permission’ for them to laugh with me, and although it started as an exercise, it was contagious and incredibly powerful, helping them to relax and deal with my illness too.

I know it all sounds a bit mad, but honestly you have to try it!  I am passionate about bringing more laughter into the lives of as many people as possible, and together Steph and I have created a DVD called “Dealing with Cancer? Laughter Works”. January can be a tough time for many people, cancer or not. Whether you’re happy, sad, or just need a little pick me up, I’d encourage you to get out of bed, grab the next person you see, or simply look in the mirror and give it a good Ho Ho Ho. It’s infectious!

In addition to being a freelancer writer and running her own Customer Experience Consultancy, Mandy is now proud to be a Director of Laughter at Grin and Tonic.