Introducing Kate!

Five years ago, Shine didn’t have any staff. In fact, we were really just getting the ball rolling on this young adult cancer charity whole thing. Looking back at where we started makes it even more exciting that we’ve just welcomed our FOURTH employee!

Read below to find out more about Kate – she’ll be supporting our 14 Shine Networks across the country. We’re still a tiny charity (with big ambitions) but we’ve grown a lot in the last few years and we couldn’t be happier to have someone new on our team!


Hello, I’m Kate!

Trying to put almost 40 years of life into a few hundred words isn’t easy AND I am not one for talking about myself, but I wanted to introduce myself and give you a bit of insight into why I do what I do.

Born in Northumberland (very proud of this!), we moved south to Bedfordshire when I was nine so my accent didn’t have a chance! Aged ten, I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes which had a huge impact on my education as I missed so much school. There was an underlying cause of the diabetes which wasn’t discovered until I was 16, so it was IMPOSSIBLE to manage!KJ PP

As a young teen, I wanted to go into medicine, but all the health stuff got in the way and I wasn’t able to finish my A-levels or go to university. Then, when I lost most of my sight in my early 20s because of diabetes, I really felt that the odds were stacked against me. Fortunately, with little sight I was still able to do some studying with the Open University, which was brilliant. After hundreds of bouts of laser treatment and a month in Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, I thankfully regained a lot of my vision and this remains fairly stable to-date.

Handling all this stuff at such a young age had a massive impact on my mental health and I really struggled with anxiety and depression, but it made me particularly interested in the impact that physical health challenges can have on our mental health. As I found it difficult to get into work, I started volunteering for a tiny mental health charity based in Luton, and before I knew it I was working with them full-time and loving it. I worked with people who had various mental health challenges, helping them to write and perform small drama pieces for health care professionals and the public to help them understand what life is like with a mental health condition. Although I was most definitely not into the drama side of things, I found it incredibly rewarding to be able to bring both sides of the coin together and to challenge perceptions, leading to changes in clinical practice. Nowadays, this would be called something fancy like ‘co-production’ – but nearly 20 years ago I don’t think that term existed!

KJ Beach 1Fast forward to today, and I have had the privilege of working for several charities including Mind, Crohn’s and Colitis UK, and most recently Cancer Research UK. My focus was volunteer management until 2015, when I took on a patient engagement role which brought patients and clinicians together at local and national levels to improve services. Over the past few months, as well as working in patient engagement, I have started to talk about my own experiences as a patient. This has been so rewarding. I have been able to get involved in an NHS Improvement initiative for patient leaders and I have also done some work with finance and insurance company American International Group (AIG), helping their managers to become more inclusive.

I am so happy to be part of Shine Cancer Support, and I feel that all the professional and personal experience that I have had fits perfectly with the role of supporting and developing Shine’s local networks. What excites me the most is working with all of you to help Shine grow and reach more people while keeping true to the Shiny vibe! What you say, what you need, and how you feel about things really matter, and together we are such a force for good. I am really looking forward to getting to know all of the network leaders, and understanding how we can work better together across Shine’s community. Without all of the amazing network leaders, Shine would simply be four people desperate to make a difference to the lives of young adults who have had a cancer diagnosis.

I get what it is like to be ill when you are just getting to grips with yourself and life: to have that rug pulled out from under you, and to have so many hopes and dreams shattered. That said, I wouldn’t change my past as it has brought me here. 2018 is a big year for me as I turn 40 in November and I am already planning the celebrations! I never expected to reach my fortieth birthday, so it really will be a big party (parties…?) and I will be more than happy to accept cake when I am out and about.

See you soon!

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Life – but not as you knew it: No way back!

One of the things that no one tells you when you’re first diagnosed with cancer is that you’ll never be the same (and if they told you, you probably wouldn’t believe them!).  Whatever the outcome of diagnosis and treatment, many people feel changed.  This can be a disorienting feeling – after all, we just want to get back to normal, don’t we?

In our latest blog, Jen shares her thoughts on some of the good  and bad  changes that she’s experienced since her diagnosis a year ago.  Here at Shine we don’t always push “positive thinking” because – let’s be frank – there’s A LOT about cancer that just isn’t positive.  However, as Jen points out, “there’s nothing like a life threatening illness to highlight what’s truly important in life”.  It’s a shame we don’t often get this insight without the life threatening illness, but it’s still worth remembering!


Jen Hart

If I had the choice of never having had cancer and returning to the life I was living before, I most definitely would. The rollercoaster of a cancer diagnosis and treatment is a long, bumpy, and terrifying ride. It’s also one that does not end where it started. To quote the title of this blog series: it’s your life, but not as you knew it!

As I slowly accept a new version of me within my strange new world I am starting to appreciate the positive changes that have come about due to my ride on the cancer rollercoaster. I may have new limits but I also have new priorities, new perspectives, and new hopes and dreams.

Following my diagnosis last October, I took a stoic approach, gritted my teeth and readied myself for six months (Ha ha! This was my first naive mistake!) of gruelling treatment. I was determined that I would get through whatever I needed to, be cured, and then return to my normal life. I would plod on with living as if cancer had never happened (this was naïve mistake number 2!).

Almost all of my family and friends shared my naïve view, and why wouldn’t they? Unless you’ve had experience to the contrary it is a perfectly sensible view to hold.   Many times throughout my treatment I was reassured by well-meaning friends and family that it would soon be over and I would get back to normal. The concept seems laughable to me now, but for at least the first few months of treatment the thought of returning to a “normal” life kept me going. I was fiercely determined not to be “changed” by cancer. I did not need a brush with my own mortality to be taught to appreciate life thank you very much!

It’s very difficult to accept change when it is forced upon you so brutally. Initially it was the superficial, physical changes that were my focus and I was determined to return to exactly how I looked “before”, as soon as possible. At times it felt as if my entire identity was encapsulated in the way I looked. I think the focus on these superficial things stems from the fact there is absolutely nothing you can do about the non-superficial things that have been changed. The scars from surgery, the damaged nerves and muscles from chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the terrible memory and disrupted thinking process – it has been hard to accept these things as part of my new life.

As time has passed, however, I’ve had to slowly learn the art of acceptance rather than try to return to ‘normal’. I will never look like I did before and I will never feel like I did before but, you know what? That’s OK. I may be the same person but my experiences have shifted my life onto a completely new trajectory.

There are, of course, the physical changes that I have to learn to live with. I must accept that I may never regain the same level of fitness and health I enjoyed before and that there may be permanent damage done by treatment. I am learning to let go of the anger and bitterness that I sometimes feel about that. It’s easy to say “well at least I’m alive” but at times it’s difficult to feel that. And then there is the threat of a recurrence that all cancer “survivors” must learn to live with. I need to learn to supress the reflex to break out in a cold sweat every time I have a nagging pain or feel a lump or bump. I am assured it gets easier with time and I’m sure it will.

Looking past these more negative aspects of my changed new reality there is, however, a much stronger and overriding positive change. There’s nothing like a life threatening illness to highlight what’s truly important in life. I have been shown the true value of relationships and witnessed the best of humanity in the love and support I’ve had showered upon me. Small acts of kindness have meant so much. I hope that in my new life I can always remember how these small gestures have impacted upon me and pay the kindness forward. I know more about myself now than I did a year ago and I have an appreciation for aspects of my personality that I perhaps didn’t previously value or recognise. I am aware of how quickly ‘good health’ can be whisked away and I find joy in simply being able to walk or run in the sunshine. I try to focus on what I am doing more and think about the future less. Living in the moment is such a cliché but, for me, it has been directly correlated with peace and happiness. In my new, post-cancer life I have found a deeper appreciation of how I can create my own happiness, and I fully intend to create as much as possible.

Returning to ‘normal’ is no longer my goal. My new normal is pretty damn good. There’s no going back. And that’s OK.

Jennifer has just finished her treatment for breast cancer. She lives in Dorset with her husband and two daughters – and, with two others, runs Shine New Forest!