10 ways to help a friend coping with cancer

We often post articles on Twitter and Facebook about what to say to a friend or family member who has cancer, or how you might help them. We’ve also noticed that these often get a huge number of hits! That got us wondering how the members of our growing Shine community have been helped by family and friends when they’ve been ill – so we asked them! We got some great responses and we’ve summarised them below. Have a friend in need? Take a look below and see if we can inspire you!


Message1. Let them know you’re thinking of them

“One of my friends sent me a card every week that I was in the hospital – and I was in there for a long time.  It was so nice to receive a surprise in the mail and to hear all her news.  I’m not sure she knows how much it meant to me but I’ve kept all the cards as a reminder of what a great friend she is”.

When you’re ill, sometimes just knowing that you’re still part of the land of the living is all you need. A text, a card, a phone call – no matter how brief – can make a huge difference to someone who hasn’t been out and about much, especially if you’re clear that you don’t expect a reply.  Being ill can be very lonely so knowing that your friends and family are still thinking of you can make a huge difference.

2. Cook

“A friend bought 12 homemade freezer meals at two separate points during chemo. Even though I didn’t feel like eating most of the time at least I knew there was something quick, easy and on hand for my husband and daughter. I was very touched at her kindness and effort”.

If you’re a whizz icookn the kitchen, there’s nothing quite like a homemade meal to perk up someone who isn’t feeling great. And even if they don’t feel like eating because treatment has done a number on their appetite, you might be easing their stress by making sure other members of their family have something quick and easy to eat when the hunger pangs hit.

3. Clean

cleaningNot big on cooking? How about cleaning? A lot of our Shine members mentioned that they’d had friends who had popped in to clean the bathroom and kitchen, or put fresh sheets on the bed (and do the laundry) while they flaked out in front of the tv.  There’s nothing quite like clean sheets and a nice fresh towel – and it doesn’t take very long either!

4. Hang out

“For me, I was happy just to have people to keep me company. I think as a young lad people don’t know what to say and some people found it easier to avoid me.  I was happiest when people just came round and played computer games or chatted, especially when I couldn’t do much else beyond letting them in!”

super-1138462_1920Your mate may not be up for a heavy night down the pub, but heading over to his or hers with a movie, a computer game or even a pack of cards can really boost someone’s spirits. Something that doesn’t require a lot of mental or physical energy – like hanging on the sofa – but keeps them involved in the world around them is often really appreciated.

 

 

5. Get them out and about

“I went to Glastonbury festival after my treatment and all my friends had to take it in turn to carry all my belongings and helping me hobble around. I felt guilty about ruining their fun, but in reality I genuinely felt they were happy to have me there.  This reassurance was enough for me.”

We get it – being around really sick people can be scary. But helping a friend by taking them out, even if they’re going to need extra support, can help them feel like they’re still participating in all the things that they should be doing.  Keep in mind that they might not be able to walk long distances or stay out late, but if you can pick them up and drive them to a restaurant, or help them carry their stuff without making them feel bad, you’re more than half way to making their day!

6. Entertain the kids

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Let’s face it, kids can be exhausting at the best of times. If your friend has little ones, why not take them out for an afternoon or come over and cook them dinner while your friend has a nap? If they’re old enough, an afternoon movie or a trip to the park could give your friend a much needed break.  Or invite your friend and the kids over. You entertain them while your friend chills out with a cup of tea!

7. Head to the hospital

Something that everyone with cancer knows is that it’s time consuming – and hospital appointments can take ages.  If your friend is spending more time with the nurses and doctors than his/her mates, why not offer to keep them company? Ask if they’d like someone to take them to the hospital, pick them up, or hang out in between.  Having someone to gossip to can be a great distraction from the blood tests, scans and doctor chats.

8. Walk their dog

12376834_10156672952605263_2785600398398241687_nDoes your friend have a pooch? Why not ask if you can help walk the dog a few times a week? If your friend is happy for you to do it, see if you can get a few other friends together and organise a walking roster. On a good day, your friend might just want company for the walk. On a bad day they’ll be glad to have someone do the walking (and poo scooping!).

9. Organise a treat

“One of the most helpful things was planning something nice for my husband and I to do or go for a treat on the week before my next chemo. These did not cost much or sometimes nothing at all but it was something to focus on in the rotten days”.

“My friends always organised a get together on “chemo eve”, which was lovely.”

Cancer can be expensive! Not only are you missing work, but you’re spending your money heading to and from the hospital, on parking charges, and on extra blankets and heating to keep you warm. If you’re looking for a simple way to cheer someone up, why not plan a night out to the cinema or a comedy show? Book tickets when you know they’re free and either take them yourself or organise for others to go with them. (One minor note of caution: if you can, check if there’s cancer in the movie at all. You’d be surprised how many people in movies die of cancer. It’s not what you need when you’re going through treatment!).

10. Help them celebrate

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Having the energy for Christmas, Easter or a birthday can be tough when you’re coping with a cancer diagnosis.  Does your friend need help buying a tree or getting the decorations out? It can be hard for people to know what they need but asking specifically how their planning for a holiday is coming can open up whole new possibilities for help! Buy the Easter eggs, plan the hunt, decorate the tree, light the candles, buy the cake….the options are practically endless.

Got more ideas? What have we missed? Let us know! Comment below or Tweet us @shinecancersupp

 

 

Life, but not as you knew it: Being a “Plus One”

Most of the blogs we feature are written by young adults who are living with cancer – but who cares for those who care for us? And what does it feel like? In our latest blog, Caroline writes about coping with her husband’s diagnosis and the ways she found to look after herself when everyone was relying on her. Shine has a small but growing “Plus Ones’ network. If you’re a partner, friend, parent or sibling of a young adult with cancer, why not join our growing Shine Plus Ones network? We run it via Facebook – just click on the link and request to join.

As always, we’d love to know what you think about this blog – and please share it with anyone you know who might be interested!


Cancer barged into our lives uninvited, ruthless and arrogant, and rapidly took the reins. Even before my husband was diagnosed, we knew something wasn’t right and our lives had already changed significantly – mostly in terms of anxiety. I would lay awake in the still of the night, hugging my nursing daughter close, terrified that I might soon be a single mum. Our life full of promise – in a new home, a new job, new friends and a new baby – was stopped in its tracks. The foundations of my life were suddenly very unstable and a new role as “carer” had been thrust upon me.

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Blogger Caroline Puschendorf

Cancer became our dictator

From the day we received the diagnosis – germ cell carcinoma, intermediate stage – the loss of control of our daily lives seemed to escalate. My life was no longer about running the home, toddler groups, changing nappies and days out as a family. It became about appointments, test results, clinics and chemo. As much as I tried to keep things “normal” for the kids, the inability to plan was overwhelming. Even mundane decisions that I previously took for granted were no longer within my control. I didn’t know from one day to the next where our family would need to be or who would look after the kids and for how long. The unpredictability of my husband’s symptoms challenged family life even on the days that weren’t disrupted by unscheduled or delayed hospital appointments.

Then, just as we were settled into a rhythm with chemo and had a “treat to cure” plan, my husband got very ill with a virus while he was neutropenic. We were back on high alert. This was a stark reminder of the fragility of our situation, the uncertainty of the future and my perceived powerlessness.

I was exhausted, emotionally drained, and my own health was beginning to unravel

Caught up in the adrenalin and anxiety of my husband’s health crisis, I neglected my own health, both physical and emotional, by repeatedly prioritising my family. I slowly realised that my health was just as important – after all, everyone was relying on me, plus it was one thing I could control. I chose to invest in myself and to proactively nourish and nurture my family. I researched and developed a “no-fad” cancer-patient friendly eating plan and set about caring for my family’s health.

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Caroline’s husband, Rob, and one of their children

As a biologist I am well aware that our bodies need a plethora of resources to function at their best. We need nourishment, rest and movement in unique and varying amounts, especially in sickness. Only when balance is achieved do we build the reserves we need to invest into others and/or support our body in recovering from illness.

Having been a carer with two young kids, I know how important my health is, but also how easy it is to put it at the bottom of the list, but once I adopted some simple strategies, my emotional and physical health – and that of my family -massively improved.

Staying in the moment

  1. Being still for 5 minutes each day. Simply breathe and be there. Accept all thoughts and feelings that come, embrace and experience them,–especially the hard, gut-wrenching ones, then release them. This is difficult, as we get so used to suppressing emotions and putting on a brave face, but this strategy stopped me misdirecting my anger, anxiety and frustration at unsuspecting and innocent parties. For example, I realised that when my son’s behaviour was uncharacteristically awful, it was actually a reflection of my anxiety, fear or stress. Acknowledging these emotions allowed us to enjoy each other and have fun.
  2. Connecting with my husband. It’s easy to slip into the role of carer and loose touch with your old relationship. Make time to love each other in the way that you used to; a partner, sister, brother, son or daughter. Love without pity, sympathy, anger or fear. Just be there with love and laughter. Remind yourselves of what you mean to one another.
  3. Being grateful every day. I used to get annoyed when people said this to me, were they expecting me to be grateful we had cancer? That’s not what I am saying. I am saying find the positives, even the little ones, each day. Is the sun shining? Did you find a parking space? Did you get good results? Were you able to share time together? Getting into the habit of thinking through the positives, event while you brush your teeth, can be a powerful thing!

Taking control of my health

In addition to the above, I also made a few changes to my diet and routine:

  1. I took Epsom salt baths 1-2 times a week. This was amazing for alleviating tension and encouraging a peaceful sleep – something that was very elusive!
  2. I cut back on caffeine and sugar. These are easy to over-dose on, especially during times of stress, but they ended up making me feel irritable and tired, which was less than ideal. I also stayed away from hospital vending machines and made sure to take healthy snacks – like fruit and raw nuts – to our appointments.
  3. I implemented a “no-fad” cancer-patient friendly diet. Taking charge of family health through food was really empowering. I found a way of eating that suited the whole family and was based largely around a mineral broth.  It was easy to eat and highly nutritious food that worked well for a chemo-weary tummy!

After three rounds of BEP chemo and major abdominal surgery, my husband is now in remission. Life is slowly returning to a new kind of normal, and that’s ok.  Cancer slowed us down and changed us, but it hasn’t broken us. There’s a lot of life to live and we are bouncing back!

Caroline Puschendorf is a nutrition and health coach who blogs regularly here.  For some of her recipes, including her Super Mineral Broth, look here.